What's the Best Way to Apply Loose Powder?

Whereas pressed powders are convenient, nothing beats the soft-focus effect you can create with a loose product. Loose powder is a great way to ensure flawless-looking skin.

Whereas pressed powders are convenient, nothing beats the soft-focus effect you can create with a loose product. Loose powder is a great way to ensure flawless-looking skin.

Applying loose products definitely takes a certain amount of practice. At first, you may end up with more powder on your clothes and vanity than on your face. But once you've nailed down the technique, the results are lightweight and natural.

 

 

Prepping your skin beforehand


You should prep your skin the same way you would for a pressed powder. Nourish your skin with a moisturiser and then apply a primer to make sure your makeup applies evenly and lasts all day.

It's particularly important to use a primer with loose products. The adhesive texture ensures that your powder really holds to the skin and stays in place.



Choosing the perfect brush


With a pressed powder, you can get away with using most any powder brush. However, with loose powder, it's always best to use a kabuki brush. Kabuki brushes have a large surface area and long but dense bristles that can really buff that powder into your skin.

Kabuki brushes come in all different shapes and sizes, with synthetic or natural bristles and rounded or angled tops. Choosing your kabuki brush is all down to personal preference and what feels most natural on your face. Round tops are generally easier to work with, but if you prefer a flat top, then go for it!

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Applying your loose powder


To avoid spilling your loose powder everywhere, gently shake some product into the lid and work from the lid as opposed to the actual container itself. This way, you can control exactly how much product you use without getting it everywhere.

When applying loose powder, ensure the product isn't sitting on top of the kabuki brush but has made its way into the bristles. Either tap excess product back into the lid or hold the brush vertically and tap the handle on a hard surface to move the powder into the bristles. This is a great way to avoid wasting product. 

Pressed powder has a heavier consistency than loose powder. If you try to buff pressed powder into your skin, it will only disturb the makeup underneath and settle in lines. However, loose powder is finely milled and should be buffed into the skin for an airbrushed finish.

Concentrate on the centre of your face, especially if you have an oily T-zone. Use the product that's left in your brush to powder the edges of your face towards the hairline; don't add more powder. Buff it all in until there are no lines or patches and you have a velvety finish.


Topping up loose powder


Loose powder isn't the easiest to top up with, and it might be worth investing in a pressed powder for on-the-go use. However, if you want to use loose powder wherever you are, a retractable kabuki brush with a lid is a viable option.

Always remove excess oil before topping up powder, using blotting paper or tissue. Work in the same way as before, buffing the powder in for a flawless finish.

Loose powder isn't the easiest cosmetic to work with, but it gives you a more natural finish than pressed powder, so it can be worth the extra effort.