Episode 38: Pregnancy Skin Tips With A Dermatologist

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

What's the weirdest thing you've ever found in your bellybutton?

Clearly our wider team at Adore Beauty weren't that keen to share their stories, but we discovered all the sh*t in Hannah's childhood memory box, what our belly buttons collect, and why we seem to always find fluff in there.

Pregnancy skincare:

This is a request we get multiple times a week - so here it is! We chat with Dr Nina Wines from Northern Sydney Dermatology and Laser about which ingredients are safe and not advised to be used during your pregnancy. We also discuss pregnancy related concerns like stretch marks, pigmentation and benign skin growths.

To visit Dr Wines at her clinic, click here.

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: IT Cosmetics Confidence in a Cream

Hannah: Juliette Has A Gun Not A Perfume Superdose

Read our disclaimer here.

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst

Guests: Dr Nina Wines

We chat with Dr Nina Wines about stretch marks, pigmentation and which ingredients are pregnancy safe

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 38 Transcript - 'Pregnancy Skin Tips With A Dermatologist'

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ the podcast.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm your host, Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your co-host, Hannah Furst. So you seem really positive at the moment. Working from home and being at home and perhaps that's because you're much more of a home body than me so it's not too much of a change. I just can't do it anymore. I'm so done with it.

Joanna Flemming:
I had a weird time at the start of isolation. I had a melt down and I was like, "Nah, I can't do this. We don't know how long it's going to be." And then a switch flicked in me and I was like, "No, this is all right. I'm good. I'm fine." And then as soon as I was in a routine and I was doing the same thing every day, I was fine. It was when it was unsure and no one knew what was happening that I felt really anxious about it, but now I'm doing okay. But as you said, I'm definitely much more of a home body and most weekends I would stay home in my dressing gown so my life really hasn't changed much.

Hannah Furst:
I have a confession to make. I actually looked up, it's actually my Google search history, this is terrible, I Googled, "Can I fly to Thailand?" And it was like, "No, you cannot fly to Thailand."

Joanna Flemming:
Are you actually serious? You thought you'd be able to.

Hannah Furst:
My Google searches last night were... because I think everything's amplified. Like, should I leave the rat race? I've been having really intense existential crying. Yeah, I've just been all over the internet doing some really weird Google searches.

Joanna Flemming:
It's going to be okay. I think very soon we should be able to travel interstate. Also just on another isolation thing, do you have any indoor plants? Because mine are just flourishing

Hannah Furst:
A couple of years ago maybe, I bought four. I spent hundreds of dollars. They all died, including cactus. Like I thought it was impossible to kill cactus.

Joanna Flemming:
It is.

Hannah Furst:
I'm not allowed to have plants.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
You know that movie, it's that Sandra Bullock movie, and at first he has to keep a plant alive, then he can keep a dog alive, and then only when he can keep a dog alive can he have a relationship.

Joanna Flemming:
I don't think I know that one.

Hannah Furst:
Have you not seen these?

Joanna Flemming:
No. It sounds a lot like How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, though.

Hannah Furst:
What kind of plants have you got?

Joanna Flemming:
I've got a few. I've got a peace lily, I've got a Monstera, I've got one of those cheese plants that has all the holes in it.

Hannah Furst:
Fancy.

Joanna Flemming:
I really love my indoor plants. I'm obsessed with them. They're like pets to me. Sometimes I just sit out and talk to them and lay there and look at them.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my gosh, Jo.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm fine, though.

Hannah Furst:
You haven't gone crazy, so I can tell. Talking to your plants is very normal. So should we get on what's on today's episode?

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. So on today's episode, we are talking about the weirdest thing you've found in your belly button because this was actually requested by listeners. And then we're talking to Dr. Nina wines. She's a dermatologist in Sydney and we're chatting about pregnancy skincare, and of course our products we didn't know we needed.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay so I put a story up on my Instagram the other day, Hannah, and I asked what people want to hear from us on the podcast, just because I like to check in occasionally and see what's missing, because we're too close to it sometimes and we forget what we haven't spoken about. I think sometimes we've had discussions and I'm like, "No, we've already spoken about that." And you're like, "No, we haven't." This week, we're talking about belly buttons and what you found in your belly button.

Hannah Furst:
We've talked about belly button piecing holes before.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes we have.

Hannah Furst:
This is an extension of that.

Joanna Flemming:
This is an extension of that. So if you missed that episode where we talked about our belly ring holes and the smells that come out of them, that's in another episode so you can refer back to that one. But basically Hannah and I both discovered that we'd squeezed the gunk out of our belly button ring holes and a lot of people related.

Hannah Furst:
So many people related. It's very stinky.

Joanna Flemming:
So if you have a fear of belly buttons, I don't know how to pronounce this word, but I'm going to try, it's called omphalophobia. I don't know if that's how you say it, but that's a fear of belly buttons. So if you have a fear of belly buttons, this segment probably isn't for you. But I put a call out to our staff at Adore Beauty and I said on our company wide channel, I was like, "Please Slack me if you have found anything weird in your belly button." And one person messaged me and that person was Courtney. And she was like, "Weird that you ask. The other day, I cleaned my belly button and I found sand in there." And I was like, "Oh, okay, cool." And she was like, "But I haven't been to the beach in over three years."

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Flemming:
That triggered my own memory. So recently, I wouldn't say recently, it was a while ago, but I found crumbs in my belly button and I can't remember the last time I ate a biscuit without a top on. I don't know how biscuit crumbs got in my belly button.

Hannah Furst:
I sometimes pull out like a dust bunny.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, yes.

Hannah Furst:
That's what I usually get in my belly button. A dust bunny.

Joanna Flemming:
I just get mainly tan residue.

Hannah Furst:
It's really deep in the belly button as well.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Do you have an innie as well, don't you?

Hannah Furst:
Yes I do.

Joanna Flemming:
I think 90% of people have innies and 10% have outties.

Hannah Furst:
Can I tell you something disgusting? My mom kept my... I don't know if this is disgusting. Maybe this is normal, but I had-

Joanna Flemming:
She kept your umbilical cord?

Hannah Furst:
Well, yeah. My mom-

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah that's normal.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, that's normal. Okay.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. I think, I think that's a generational thing.

Hannah Furst:
So it was really funny. We were talking about this the other day. Linda kept, they were called our memory boxes, and by the time I was in grade six, we had like 10 memory boxes each. She would put any card we received, like dear Hannah, happy birthday. Love, X, Y, Z. And Ruby the other day, my sister was like, "Mom, why didn't you keep every single card we ever received?"

Joanna Flemming:
I'm surprised that Linda did that. I didn't pick Linda as a sentimental person

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, she did. She kept everything. And then we had to go through them when we all moved out of home and there was like hundreds of cards with no message. Just like the message that's printed. And then I also found my umbilical cord and my teeth as well.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, okay. Teeth is a bit weird.

Hannah Furst:
Do you know what else she kept?

Joanna Flemming:
What? This is freaking me out a little bit.

Hannah Furst:
So when I was two, my mom found under the bed that I'd cut my own fringe off, and my mom found the hair.

Joanna Flemming:
Classic Hannah. Haven't changed a bit.

Hannah Furst:
I hid it under my bed and that lock of hair was in my memory box.

Joanna Flemming:
Aw, that's cute. Do you think she wouldn't notice? You just hid it and thought she wouldn't notice you cut your fringe off?

Hannah Furst:
We did that a lot. Our babysitter couldn't deal with us.

Joanna Flemming:
I can imagine.

Hannah Furst:
Once what we did with the babysitter, I'm sorry this has gone a bit off topic, but I felt so sorry for this babysitter. Alice and I got all the clothes from all the drawers in the house and threw them over the balcony.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh my God. Why? Why wasn't she supervising you? I don't feel sorry for her if she wasn't watching you.

Hannah Furst:
She didn't know what to do. Can you imagine-

Joanna Flemming:
Tell you now.

Hannah Furst:
... how I'd be as a five-year-old?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, I can. You need to be told no.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God. We were terrors. We terrorized our babysitters.

Joanna Flemming:
Anyway, back to belly buttons. So you mentioned that you get lint in your belly button?

Hannah Furst:
Yes.

Joanna Flemming:
I basically just get tan residue because I obviously don't clean it out enough. But there's apparently this special type of hair that grows inside your belly button, I found this on the internet, and they have tiny barbs that protrude and they rub against your clothing. So they're apparently arranged in a way that acts as a funnel and it can suck fluff into your belly button.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, that's why you get all the fluff in your belly.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, that makes sense.

Joanna Flemming:
Have you ever touched your belly button and felt sick from it? Like have you ever gone to clean it and you feel sick afterwards, like you just feel a bit weird?

Hannah Furst:
No.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh really?

Hannah Furst:
No.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, okay, because I've done that before and it made me feel really sick. And so I looked that up and apparently if you put your finger in your belly button, it sends a signal to the deeper fibers in your inner abdominal cavity, so that can make you feel sick or a bit weird or give you a bit of a tingly.

Hannah Furst:
That's so weird. That's very weird.

Joanna Flemming:
I know. I can't even think about belly buttons too much because it's honestly like where they come from and everything. My sister in law pregnant right now and I just look at her and I'm like, that's a baby in you. If you actually think about it too much, it's a little bit freaky.

Hannah Furst:
I'm just looking at my belly button now.

Joanna Flemming:
I'll look at mine, too.

Hannah Furst:
I just wish I'd never got that piercing.

Joanna Flemming:
Same. I have big regret about that.

Hannah Furst:
Big regret. That hole will never, ever close over.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, I know. I wish I had known that at the time. I didn't even know that. I was just 15 and I was like, it's cool.

Hannah Furst:
My belly is carrying a bit of extra weight at the moment so I can hardly see my belly button at all.

Joanna Flemming:
Please. God, you're dramatic.

Hannah Furst:
Please don't take that the wrong way. I'm not complaining. I'm very body positive at the moment, I promise.

Speaker 3:
If you like the sound of any of the products you've heard on today's episode, new Adore Beauty customers can get $15 off their first order with orders over $75. Only valid for first time customers. Brand exclusions and terms of conditions apply. Head to adorebeauty.com.au/podcast.

Joanna Flemming:
Welcome to our next guest, dermatologist Dr. Nina Wines joins us today from Northern Sydney Dermatology and Laser. Nina, your subspecialty interest is women's dermatology, especially skin disorders relating to pregnancy, so we thought you'd be the perfect person to come on today to chat about pregnancy skincare.

Dr Nina Wines:
Nice to meet you both, girls. I'm happy to talk about one of my very, very favorite topics, pregnancy and the skin. It's such a large, vast topic, and it's great that you're talking about this.

Joanna Flemming:
Well, can we start with the question that I'm wondering, how does the skin change during pregnancy? Does it differ in each trimester?

Dr Nina Wines:
Yeah, there are some differences as the pregnancy progresses along. Of course there's heaps of hormone change, there's loads of estrogen hanging around, which affects the skin, hair and nails, and as the pregnancy progresses, the effects get more and more. There's a lot of increased oil secretions, so the skin gets a little bit shiny, which gives it that lovely glow. And of course blood volume. I'm not sure if many of your listeners know, your blood volume increases by 50%, so that gives you nice rosy cheeks and sort of a more supple appearance to your skin. But as we progress along in pregnancy, other problems emerge such as stretch marks and things like that and pigmentation, and also pregnant ladies get those little benign skin growths, like skin tags on the neck that they really hate and their moles get a bit bigger and things like that, so they come to me to help them with that as well.

Hannah Furst:
So you touched briefly on there, the pregnancy glow. So there is actually a medical explanation for the pregnancy glow. Do some people have it and some people don't?

Dr Nina Wines:
No. I mean, everyone has exactly the same physiological changes in pregnancy, loads of hormone changes and increased oil secretion and blood flow. But the issue is is that like everything in life where everyone is individualized in how they respond to those changes, so some people unfortunately will be a bit more prone to acne and stretch marks, and also remember some ladies get so, so sick with lots of vomiting, the poor things, and that leads to dehydration, which can make the skin look a little bit dry and certainly they lose that glow.

Joanna Flemming:
That's a really good point. What are some of the common misconceptions about skincare specifically during pregnancy?

Dr Nina Wines:
The thing that I struggle with most is that all the moms to be so scared about what they're applying on the skin because, of course, they don't want to do anything that's harmful to their baby. The skin is a really thick, thick barrier. It does protect us from lots and lots of things. It's got a very good function in that regard. And with the exception of hydroquinone, a lot of products aren't really absorbed in vast volumes. And certainly I want to get across that message that sunscreen is safe, although in pregnancy, I'd probably choose more of a physical blocker. And I also want to tell people that topical oils don't really prevent stretch marks.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay. Controversial.

Hannah Furst:
I had read that. When I was doing a bit of research into it, I had read that there's no scientific evidence that oils prevent stretch marks.

Joanna Flemming:
A lot of women swear by bio oil.

Hannah Furst:
My mom swears by the fact that she used oil. So I wonder where that comes from, if you can enlighten us.

Dr Nina Wines:
Well, when you think about it, the baby and the fluid around the baby creates a lot of stretch, and if you've got a teeny tiny mom and a really, really big tall dad, of course you're going to have a bigger baby in a tiny woman, and that's going to put a lot of tension on the skin and it doesn't matter what you apply, there's no way you're going to prevent that tension on the skin. So oils make the skin feel softer and more supple, but there's no scientific papers absolutely showing that these oils can prevent stretch marks.

Joanna Flemming:
Very interesting.

Hannah Furst:
Very interesting. Are there any ingredients that are definite no nos, and what are they usually listed as on the ingredients label of your typical skincare product?

Dr Nina Wines:
That's a fantastic question, girls. Everyone knows vitamin A derivatives, such as retinoids and retinols are the big no no in pregnancy. Retinoids are the prescriptive strength vitamin A's, whereas retinols are the more cosmetic vitamin A's. So the prescriptions are like tazarotene, adapalene and tretinoin, whereas the cosmetic skincare products will have words like retinol palmitate, retinol acetate, retinol linoleate. For instance, I tend to ease away from vitamin A derivatives just to be careful. Also I mentioned before, hydroquinone, to avoid that. Beta hydroxy acids is a little bit controversial. Some studies show that it doesn't penetrate, but I just think until it's a bit clearer to avoid that. And labels can have things like trophic acid or beta hydroxy acid, salicylic acid, or even willow extract. So there are a lot of words to remember, but there's some of them.

Dr Nina Wines:
Also girls, another controversial point is that essential oils are not studied and a lot of my patients make up their own little concoctions to rub on their belly when they're pregnant, but we just don't know enough about those oils and certainly if they're put onto the body and high concentrations, they might be like hydroquinone, we don't know. And no one's studied them, so I tend to tell my patients to avoid the essential oils until we know a bit more.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, I had heard that essential oils were a little bit of a unknown, because I think a lot of people when they become pregnant think that natural skincare might be better for during their pregnancy. Is there any research or anything to indicate that natural skincare is better to use while you're pregnant?

Dr Nina Wines:
Once again, another controversial topic because there absolutely isn't any definitive evidence, and that gets you into the bigger, broader conversation about what constitutes natural skincare and every skincare product in the world needs to contain some sort of agent to prevent bacterial growth. That's usually a preservative. And as we mentioned, the essential oils are just not studied, and some of those plant based materials are not fully studied. So as a professional, I can't say yes to them, but I'm sure many women of the world have used them with no problems.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. In the absence of certain ingredients in your routine, what ingredients do you recommend during pregnancy?

Dr Nina Wines:
I love just telling people that yes, you still have to use actives in pregnancy, for sure. And some of the problems that women do experience, of course, of the pigmentation and the acne and rosacea and itchy skin and a funny little benign growth. So my skincare regime, I do recommend generally to contain actives such as vitamin C and vitamin B. I'm sure you're all up to speed with that. Alpha hydroxy acids are safe and they make the skin look so beautiful, such as glycolic acids and lactic acids. Obviously I substitute that for vitamin A. Azelaic acid instead of hydroquinone is a great skin lightening agent to prevent pigmentation. And always sort of head towards the physical blockers, such as invisible zinc instead of the chemical blockers, simply because oxybenzone or avobenzone can contain... Well, we don't know enough about them put it that way. So I just tend to say maybe we'll just stay away from those just until after pregnancy.

Dr Nina Wines:
Just one more thing, just the body moisturizer because itchy skin occurs in 15% of pregnant women, so staying ahead of the game and working in a beautiful body moisturizer within sort of five minutes of coming out of a shower can really help to reduce that itchy skin in pregnancy.

Hannah Furst:
You just touched briefly on pigmentation. I was wondering why pigmentation is so common in pregnancy and how can someone effectively manage it during their pregnancy?

Dr Nina Wines:
It's super, super common and it really, really upsets ladies, as you can imagine. There's just such a lot of estrogen flying around when you're pregnant and that combined with your genes, what you're blessed with, and sunlight, of course, is the perfect playground for melasma formation. It's sort of a bit of the lack of the juror in the end in terms of your genetic makeup. But I normally recommend a physical blocker, lasers and hydroquinone in the non-pregnant state. However, obviously hydrocodone and lasers aren't safe in pregnancy, so during pregnancy, I treat it with some alpha hydroxy acid pills or alpha hydroxy acid topicals, some vitamin B, some vitamin C. Very, very good. As I mentioned before, azelaic acid is great. And then as soon as the baby comes up, we can do a bit of laser that can sort of help the process. But remember, just for you out there, not to feel despair because it does lighten after the baby comes out. So that's great.

Joanna Flemming:
You touched a little bit there on some of the professional treatments that are okay during pregnancy. Are there any other treatments aside from your AHA peels that you can have done in a professional sense in a clinic while you're pregnant?

Dr Nina Wines:
Some effective LED light based treatments that we can perform.

Joanna Flemming:
My favorite.

Dr Nina Wines:
It's very relaxing as well. And it's effective, particularly I use that a lot for my poor ladies who get terrible acne flares in pregnancy or rosacea flares or the bacne. It's great for that. Skin needling, I really like it in a supervised setting because unfortunately, I've been referred a lot of patients who've had some problems relating to some side effects from skin needling. But with some skin needling done in a careful setting with proper education, that can be fantastic as well.

Joanna Flemming:
So what are the changes, you did mention some women experience quite severe acne or rosacea or bacne during pregnancy. What can women expect post-pregnancy when the hormones start to return to normal?

Dr Nina Wines:
So obviously I see a lot of ladies post-pregnancy because we for those who have had babies, you feel a bit tired and a bit worn out, so want to get back to feeling as normal as possible. So some of the things that I do manage, acne and rosacea, spider veins, which are those little red veins that people can get on their face or chest. They do resolve naturally, but a bit of laser can help those. Stretch marks are the big thing. 90% of women do experience stretch marks and the best time to treat them as early as possible post delivery when they're really red and pink and that's when flash pump dye laser makes a massive difference. And also benign little skin growths really affects ladies, so skin tags everywhere, but to once again reassure that this does improve post-pregnancy.

Dr Nina Wines:
I don't know if you have heard of something called the linea nigra, which has a long nutritional line of pigmentation from the belly button down to the... That's something that people get a bit worried about, but once again, I reassure that will absolutely go away and I would absolutely not waste anyone's time on lays of that because it will just go away quickly. And then of course there's a whole host of more rare pregnancy specific skin rashes that can occur, but they're a bit super specialized and not too many people experience those.

Joanna Flemming:
I know that a lot of women experience hair loss post-pregnancy. Is that something that you deal with in your clinic as well? Because I know that dermatologists and trichologists deal with that a lot. Is that something that women come to you for as well?

Dr Nina Wines:
Yes, absolutely. So pregnancy is a state where you get beautiful, luscious hair because it just forces the hair into stay put if you like. I won't use complex terms. But then after delivery, we all shed hair. And when it's extreme, it's called telogen gravidarum, and that's when you get this really massive loss of hair, not complete bald, but just a lot of hair, and that's very distressing for people who really love their hair and identify hair as their best feature. So people do come and see us for that. There are certain medications and topical treatments that we can use to help. But yes, it's a very common concern, but it does, once again, cease, but if it goes on for greater than sort of six to 12 weeks, then we institute some treatment for people.

Joanna Flemming:
And I also did want to ask a question because my sister in law is pregnant at the moment and I was speaking to her the other day and asked her if her hair had grown back after having laser hair removal and she said it was starting to grow back. So is that all the hormones that start to trigger that hair growth again, even if you've had laser hair removal prior to your pregnancy?

Dr Nina Wines:
That's such a fantastic question. Yes, it is. It is absolutely. It's just those excess hormones can cause a little bit of a recurrence of the hair a bit like what happens in teenagers. So we can just do a bit more laser hair reduction, just the top up treatment for that. It's generally not too dramatic in most women, so it's very easily rectified.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay. So what I'm gathering from this whole conversation is don't use your retinols or salicylic acid or hydroquinone while pregnant. You can still use your actives. You can still use AHAs. You can still have some treatments in clinic with a dermatologist or clinician. That's pretty much what I'm gathering from this conversation. So if anyone that's listened to this whole thing and go wait, wait, wait, I'm still confused, I think that's probably the basics.

Dr Nina Wines:
The only thing we ask is you do come into the clinic, please bring your baby because our nurses are so clucky. They all swarm around the babies and they absolutely love it.

Hannah Furst:
That's like our office when someone comes in with the baby. That must be common across workplaces.

Joanna Flemming:
Absolutely. Well, thank you so much for joining us. Dr. Nina Wines works out of Northern Sydney Dermatology and Laser if you'd like to go and see her. Thanks for joining us, Nina.

Hannah Furst:
Thank you so much.

Dr Nina Wines:
Thanks girls.

Joanna Flemming:
Product We didn't know we needed. Hannah, start us off.

Hannah Furst:
I have another story, as I always do.

Joanna Flemming:
Yep, love that.

Hannah Furst:
I was leaving the office quite late. It must've been 6:00 or 6:30 and Dani, who is our senior category manager, she was walking down with me and I was like... Can you hear me sniffing?

Joanna Flemming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
I was sniffing like a dog. And I was like what is that scent? And I said, "Is that not a perfume?" And she was like, "Oh, it's actually Juliette has a Gun Not a Perfume Superdose." And I was like, "Did you put that on in the morning?" And she's like, "I cannot believe you can still smell it." It was like it was following her through the car park.

Joanna Flemming:
I have a question. So Juliette has a Gun is like a molecule perfume. So is it an EDT or an EDP?

Hannah Furst:
As if I know. What?

Joanna Flemming:
Eau de toilette or an eau de parfum.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, EDT. It's EDP. Well, not only is it a EDP, it's also Superdose.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. Okay.

Hannah Furst:
So Juliet has a Gun Not a Perfume is I think it's our bestselling fragrance. So it's made from Cetalox. Cetalox is a molecule and it's got a woody, musky, amber scent and what's strong sillage?

Joanna Flemming:
Sillage, yep. So that's like a way that it lasts on the skin. So with the molecule perfumes, when you spray it onto the skin, it mixes with your own chemistry and so it creates kind of your own individual scent so it doesn't smell the same on anyone. You can tell that it's that perfume, but it smells slightly different on every person.

Hannah Furst:
It says here, which is just so true, it leaves a powerful trail. Like it really does. It's weird because it's not what you would traditionally think of as a really sexy perfume. But for me, it is the sexiest perfume that I've ever smelled. You know how people have their signature scent and they kind of don't sway from that.

Joanna Flemming:
They don't stray from it.

Hannah Furst:
For 31 years, I've not been like that. I've tried a million different fragrances and now this is my scent. Like this is the one. And yes, I've copied two other people at work, but I don't care. This is my scent. Juliet has a Gun not a Perfume Superdose is my scent. Do you have their hand cream as well?

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. I've got the hand cream as well. And that's very nice.

Hannah Furst:
If you don't want to splurge, a Superdose is 219 and the normal Not a Perfume is 209. You can actually get a 7.5 mil spray that's only 39, so you can actually try it.

Joanna Flemming:
I've got that spray in my bag. And I use it flat out.

Hannah Furst:
You can try the Not a Perfume fragrance and then if you want to get a stronger version of that, the Superdose is the one for you. But who do you think it's not suitable for? I guess if you like floral fragrances, it's probably not what you're going to be wanting.

Joanna Flemming:
No, it does have some sweetness to it I think. I reckon it's a really universal scent.

Hannah Furst:
I can't describe it.

Joanna Flemming:
It is very hard to explain, but it's also I don't think it's overpowering or it's not so specific that it would be like off putting to anyone. I think it's a really quite a universal female scent, I would say.

Hannah Furst:
So that is my product that I didn't know I needed. What's yours?

Joanna Flemming:
Great. Mine is IT Cosmetics' Confidence in a Cream. I don't know how I haven't really spoken about this yet because I've been using it for quite a while and I really love it. So this is a moisturizer, but it's got kind of built in priming ingredients in it. So I really love to use this before I put makeup on. Not that I've been really wearing much makeup in isolation, but I did do a makeup tutorial for my own Instagram and I did use this because it has such a nice texture. It's really creamy, it just glides onto the skin, and it just makes your foundation go on really flawless. It's got hyaluronic acid in it, it's got ceramides, it's got amino acids. It's got quite nice ingredients in it and it's suitable for all skin types.

Joanna Flemming:
I personally would recommend it more for dry skin or dry to normal skin. That's my skin type. I'd say for you, Hannah, it's probably a bit too rich. I think you might get a bit too much shine throughout the day, but it's a great product and it also comes in a mini version as well, which I think is really good. It's $72, so if you don't want to commit to the full size before you've tried it on your skin, I would get the mini one. I think that's about 24 bucks. But this is such a nice product to put on under makeup. I highly, highly recommend. Also it just doubles as a primer. So that's mine for today.

Hannah Furst:
Very nice. I love IT Cosmetics.

Joanna Flemming:
Same.

Hannah Furst:
And I'm using their eye cream at the moment, too.

Joanna Flemming:
Are you?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
How's that?

Hannah Furst:
I know. I like it. I like everything that IT Cosmetics does.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. They do have some really, really good products. And also they really address-

Hannah Furst:
Concerns.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, they just address things that other brands don't.

Hannah Furst:
Yes. So I guess what I do want to know is we've had a review on the podcast about, was it stop the curl talk?

Joanna Flemming:
Yep, I know the one.

Hannah Furst:
That curly hair is not something that you need to make the most of or to deal with. And I actually would respectfully like to disagree because curly hair is something that is really hard to deal with for me, personally, and my sister says the same thing. It's actually not the same as having straight hair, and so the reason that we've been talking about curly hair is because I'm a bit of a journey to figure out because if you damage your curl through heat tools, it's really hard to get it back.

Joanna Flemming:
And it's also a more complex hair texture as well and learning to treat it well.

Hannah Furst:
Totally, yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
My really good friends has curly hair too and she never wears it curly but it looks amazing when she wears it curly, and she just refuses to because she finds it too hard to manage. So I think a lot of people will see your point of view there, Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
Hopefully. So I'm not going to stop the curl talk, I'm very sorry. But we do take on a lot of your feedback.

Joanna Flemming:
Absolutely we do. But I think more hair episodes are in the works. We're going to talk about blondes at some point. So there'll be more hair talk on the cards.

Hannah Furst:
There will definitely be more hair talk. Well, hope you're all doing well. And we will see you next week.

Joanna Flemming:
See you next week.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Flemming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast, so if you can leave us a review, that would be much appreciated.

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