Ep 21: Why You Need To Ditch Your Mascara Every 3 Months

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

Look away now if eyes make you squirm!

Special guest (and fellow team member) Megan joins us for our cringey convo to discuss our gross eye stories (warning: they might make your skin crawl!). Hannah shares a rather strange childhood story that led to her winding up in the Eye & Ear Hospital.

Now onto eye health...

Dr Natalie Savin from Eye Scan in Toorak joins us to bust some eye health myths, like what causes conjunctivitis, what happens if you share mascara, and she gives us an expert tip related to your makeup brushes.

You can visit Natalie in her clinic here: https://eyescan.com.au/book-now

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: MODELROCK Signature Lashes - Wispy Flower https://www.adorebeauty.com.au/modelrock/model-rock-signature-lashes-wispy-flower.html?utm_source=omny&utm_medium=podcast

Hannah: Maybelline Great Lash Mascara  https://www.adorebeauty.com.au/maybelline/maybelline-great-lash-mascara-waterproof.html?utm_source=omny&utm_medium=podcast

Credits: 

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst 

Guest: Dr Natalie Savin

 

Don't forget to subscribe & tell your friends - it helps people discover us! 




Eye Health with Dr Natalie Savin plus What Happens if You Share Mascara

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 21 Transcript - 'Why You Need To Ditch Your Mascara Every 3 Months'

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ, the podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm your host Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your co-host Hannah Furst. So, this episode is dedicated to the little spoken about window to the soul. What is it, Joanna?

Joanna Fleming:
Your eyes? I think-

Hannah Furst:
I feel like we-

Joanna Fleming:
... you're getting weird and spiritual on me.

Hannah Furst:
... we never talk about eyes.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, we don't really.

Hannah Furst:
We're really dedicating our whole episode to the eye.

Joanna Fleming:
I felt there was enough, there was enough-

Hannah Furst:
There's enough.

Joanna Fleming:
... here to work with.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, totally.

Joanna Fleming:
So on today's episode, our cringey convo-

Hannah Furst:
Please don't, please don't ... switch off now that you've heard about what the episode is about!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, I know.

Hannah Furst:
It's actually really-

Joanna Fleming:
People get really squeamish about eyes, don't they?

Hannah Furst:
No, it's a really good episode.

Joanna Fleming:
So we've got a guest in, to join us for our cringey convo, to talk about gross eye stories. Don't let that put you off, they're relatively funny.

Hannah Furst:
And Linda my mom calls in.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes! And then we have an optometrist visiting us, so she's going to talk about all things contacts, mascara, all of that stuff. And of course, our products we didn't know we needed.

Hannah Furst:
Eye edition?

Joanna Fleming:
Eye edition. Sure! Let's go with it. So since today's episode is going to be all about eyes, I thought, "What better time to bring up some really disgusting eye stories?" Because I know that people get squeamish about it.

Hannah Furst:
And to also introduce our-

Joanna Fleming:
Yes! We want to introduce a team member.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, from our team-

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
... to our podcast ... people.

Joanna Fleming:
Hi, Megan.

Megan:
Hello, everyone.

Joanna Fleming:
This is Megan. She's a new voice, but you might have seen her on our Instagram. And she has some pretty gross eyes stories. So we thought that we'd just bring her on to talk about it for today's cringey convo.

Hannah Furst:
I'm surprised you didn't ask me about my gross eyes story.

Joanna Fleming:
I did! But I spoke about it with Megan before that-

Hannah Furst:
Okay.

Joanna Fleming:
... and I was like, "Oh Hannah, will have heaps!"

Hannah Furst:
Always.

Joanna Fleming:
But I did want to start with a story that I mentioned in the office, and that was when I was little, my best friend went camping with her family and she got a leech in her eye.

Hannah Furst:
Oh no!

Joanna Fleming:
And they had to put salt in her eye to get it out, to make it fall out.

Hannah Furst:
Ew!

Joanna Fleming:
How gross is that?

Hannah Furst:
You know there's that meme about a snake going into your vagina being your biggest fear?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah!

Hannah Furst:
I think that might be my bigger fear. I think I'd rather a snake in my vagina than a leech on my eye.

Joanna Fleming:
I don't even know what a leech on my eye would feel like. I should have asked her, actually.

Hannah Furst:
Have you ever had a leech?

Joanna Fleming:
No.

Hannah Furst:
So we used to go down to my grandpa, had this like little cabin in Marysville or something, and I refused to go down because the leeches. So you would literally go walking outside of the cabin and you would come back with leeches all over your legs.

Joanna Fleming:
Ew!

Megan:
Ew!

Joanna Fleming:
I didn't know that was a thing.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, you have to flick them off. I don't know if that's true, but that's what my dad told us to do. So you flick them off.

Megan:
Oh, that makes sense!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I've never really had an experience with a leech, but that really threw me off camping, that's for sure!

Hannah Furst:
When you notice they're sucking your blood, it's honestly one of the most ... It's disgusting. I can't think of a worst animal.

Joanna Fleming:
We really just got off track onto leeches. This was meant to be about eyes. We could discuss leeches on a further episode.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I think there's a whole cringey convo in leeches, "Have you ever had a leech in your vagina? Please let us know." Oh, that is a big fear!

Joanna Fleming:
So Megan, you have quite an interesting story.

Megan:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
Please tell us what you happened to put in your eye accidentally.

Megan:
Well, I've got two. Should I start off with the [crosstalk 00:03:23] one-

Joanna Fleming:
Go! Go for it!

Megan:
... or the gross one?

Joanna Fleming:
The gross one.

Megan:
I'll start off with the gross one.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Megan:
Okay. So I'll just set the scene for everyone. I was 16, and I was about to turn 17 the next day. So it was a Friday night, I was in bed ready to go to bed, and then I could feel like my eye was a little bit itchy, so I'm like, "Oh!" Because I was getting hay fever at the time.

Megan:
So I'm like, "Oh, I better get up and I'll just put an eye drop in," because I had an 18th birthday the next night, and I wanted to look absolutely amazing.

Hannah Furst:
Been there.

Megan:
So I'm like, "Yeah, yeah. I have to look good. I'll go put the eye drop in. I don't want a red eye for tomorrow. That'll be like end of the world." So I got up, went into the bathroom, put the eye drop in. As soon as I put the eye drop in, I knew something had definitely gone wrong. So I quickly turn the light on. I had put super glue in my eye.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my god!

Megan:
So you know like the-

Joanna Fleming:
Why do you have super glue in your bathroom?

Megan:
Let me explain, let me explain! So you know the manicure ... like little packs of [crosstalk 00:04:24]?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah!

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Okay, now it's all coming together and coming full circle.

Megan:
And so it came with the little glue. So I used to do that all the time, those little manis. And yeah, unfortunately, like I was young and a bit clueless. I had kept my ... Which I don't know why my eye drops weren't refrigerated, to be honest, but they weren't. Yeah, so those two bottles were right next to each other and they looked the exact same. Because they were like little and white.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my gosh!

Joanna Fleming:
We want to post a photo of your eye.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah!

Megan:
Okay, I've got the photo here.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, yes! Oh, my god!

Megan:
I'll show you guys-

Joanna Fleming:
Show us the photo!

Megan:
... the visual. So I'll finish the story. So yeah, I put the super glue in my eye, and I was like, "Oh, no!" I was freaking out. So I quickly ran into my mom's room, I'm like, "Mom!"

Joanna Fleming:
Were you crying?

Megan:
No, I was just like, "Oh my god." And I was like, "Mom, I just put super glue in my eye." She's like, "No!" Anyways, so she called NURSE-ON-CALL, and it was like this big ordeal. In the meantime, I'm trying to get the super glue out, and the nurse is like, "Please stop doing that because you're-"

Joanna Fleming:
Were your lashes glued together?

Megan:
No. So I literally tilted my head back, put the super glue in-

Joanna Fleming:
Wow!

Megan:
... right into the eye.

Joanna Fleming:
Hannah uses eye drops all the time, so I feel like you're feeling this.

Megan:
Yeah, the NURSE-ON-CALL was like, "Go to the Eye and Ear Hospital." We were driving there-

Hannah Furst:
I've been there.

Megan:
Yeah, it's [crosstalk 00:05:34]! My dad is screaming at me like, "You're so careless!" And I'm crying, and then my mom is like, "Well, don't cry!"

Hannah Furst:
And you had the 18th birthday the next day?

Megan:
Yeah, well ... Mom's like, "Don't cry!" She's actually, "Keep crying. The salt water is good." Or you think it is. Anyway, so I went there, spent the night there, but they said I was really lucky because ... because it was like an eye drop, I'd tilted my head back. So it had scratched all the top part of the top layer.

Megan:
But they said because it was in the white bit, because I tilted my head back, it was fine. But had it been on the pupil-y area, I would have pretty much been blind in that eye.

Joanna Fleming:
That's insane!

Hannah Furst:
Oh my god!

Megan:
I was just very lucky.

Joanna Fleming:
So lucky.

Megan:
So yeah-

Joanna Fleming:
But most importantly, did you go to the 18th?

Megan:
No, I didn't! Because I looked like this. I will show you.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. Yeah, show us.

Megan:
And I was so upset-

Hannah Furst:
Are we allowed to post it on Instagram?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, I've asked permission.

Hannah Furst:
Oh okay.

Megan:
I don't know if you want to, you guys. I was 17, by the way, so I had a baby face. But yeah, my two girlfriends ... That's me in the hospital.

Hannah Furst:
Oh! You actually don't ... You still look pretty!

Megan:
Let me show you the next photo of the next morning.

Hannah Furst:
I always ... You never know who you're going to meet at hospital, Jo!

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, look at you!

Hannah Furst:
You really do look 17 there.

Megan:
Yeah. So the weird crusty eye, that's the one that had the super glue in.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Megan:
Yeah, I didn't get to go to the party.

Hannah Furst:
Fair, fair.

Megan:
But my two best friends went, which I was just really salty about-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Megan:
And what was-

Joanna Fleming:
They really should have been supporting you at home.

Hannah Furst:
And what was your other story?

Megan:
Oh, the other story! I think this would have happened to many, many people. So I was on my Europe trip, and I had put my contacts in, and it was like a big day of sightseeing. Anyway, we get back to the hotel room, and I went to take my contact out. And on one eye, only half the contact came out.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, yes.

Megan:
And I'm like, "Oh, okay. I'll just try find it." Anyways, so I was searching, searching, searching. I couldn't find it. So I'm like, "Oh, it must have just fallen out," like whatever. Anyway, so I kept ... There was still like weeks of the trip, it was fine, went to our next great Greek island. Anyway, I woke up one day with my eye like that.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh!

Megan:
And I was like, "Oh!"

Joanna Fleming:
She's showing us a picture of a crusty eye.

Hannah Furst:
Crusty. A crusty eye.

Megan:
A really crusty, gross eye. And I was like, "Oh, that's a bit weird, but whatever." So I went to the chemist, in Greece, and they gave me some eye drops. And it kind of cleared it for a bit, so I was like, "Oh, whatever." Anyway, so I didn't really think anything of it. Came back home, was still wearing contacts. Like these colored ones? Like the really thick ones? And then, about three weeks after I'd been home, I just had a nap one day and I woke up, and I wiped my eye, the other half of the contact came out.

Hannah Furst:
Ah! Yeah, yeah.

Megan:
It had been in there for five weeks!

Hannah Furst:
That's pretty bad. I wear contacts-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, but could that have been doing damage?

Hannah Furst:
No, because you can feel it. If you get a flipped contact lens under your eye, you can feel it. How did you not feel it? It must've been lodged somewhere where you have no nerve endings.

Megan:
I think it was right back. And also, because it was only half, it wasn't a full one.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, it wasn't a full one.

Megan:
I could still feel-

Hannah Furst:
You can't appreciate this, Joanna.

Joanna Fleming:
I can't. I don't. Yeah. I don't wear contacts.

Hannah Furst:
I just thought of a contact story.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes?

Hannah Furst:
So I started wearing contact lenses when I was 15, and at that time I went to a school where you had to go away for a year. That sounds like I went to a naughty school, but I just went to a school where they sent us away to the bush free, yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
I hate that so much.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I did too. But [crosstalk 00:08:56].

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
So I started wearing contact lenses then, and I refused to touch my eyes. So I actually couldn't put my contact lenses in. So I would come home ... So we came home-

Joanna Fleming:
That was silly, wasn't it?

Hannah Furst:
Well, life doesn't always work out the way you want it to!

Joanna Fleming:
Why didn't you wear your glasses?

Hannah Furst:
Because you know I don't wear glasses! Let me just explain that. That's not a vanity thing, it's because I don't like ... This is going to sound weird. I don't like there to be something between me and the world.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah!

Hannah Furst:
I feel like ... And the only other eye thing that I did, which is so me, is that I once lost control of a bit of petrol. Hence, why I was at the eye hospital. I once lost control of the-

Joanna Fleming:
The bowser?

Hannah Furst:
... the nuzzle, as I was filling the petrol. And I got petrol splashed all in my eyes!

Joanna Fleming:
Oh no!

Hannah Furst:
This [crosstalk 00:09:41]-

Joanna Fleming:
Did it go on your face?

Hannah Furst:
I passed out.

Joanna Fleming:
Whoa, Whoa! Hang on. Wait!

Megan:
Were you drinking?

Hannah Furst:
No! I literally-

Joanna Fleming:
How old were you?

Hannah Furst:
... I passed out.

Joanna Fleming:
Is this last week?

Hannah Furst:
No! I lost control of it, got petrol in face, passed out-

Joanna Fleming:
How do you lose control?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I'm laughing because she's acting like it's a wild animal, like I lost control of it.

Joanna Fleming:
You control the nozzle! What do you mean?

Hannah Furst:
I can't tell you the full story, we might have to cut this out. My mom won't [crosstalk 00:10:08].

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, no! Why?

Hannah Furst:
I actually have to stop it.

Joanna Fleming:
What?

Hannah Furst:
I was such a bad teenager, I was really hard to manage, and so ... I'm like, "Mom, I'm doing the petrol!"

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, I filled up the petrol as a teenager.

Hannah Furst:
"Mom, I'm doing the petrol." And she just gave up and was like, "[beep], do the petrol." And then I lost control of it, or I wasn't holding it properly.

Joanna Fleming:
How old were you?

Hannah Furst:
I can't remember. But I was-

Joanna Fleming:
Were you on your Learner's?

Hannah Furst:
... early teenagers.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, okay.

Hannah Furst:
No, no. Early, like early ...

Megan:
Oh my god, that's so funny!

Hannah Furst:
I was young. And then I literally passed out and was seeing all these stick figures in my head. It was like-

Megan:
You must have hit your head.

Hannah Furst:
I don't know!

Joanna Fleming:
What was it?

Hannah Furst:
I just remember distinctly passing out and having this weird thing, like dream going on in my head. And then I came to, and they're flushing my eyes out with water. And then I got sent to the hospital.

Megan:
Oh my gosh.

Hannah Furst:
But it was all fine!

Joanna Fleming:
Why wouldn't Linda let you tell that story?

Hannah Furst:
Because it's like childhood ... You can't-

Joanna Fleming:
It's not! You insisted! It was your fault! It wasn't Linda's fault!

Hannah Furst:
You can't ... I'd have to ask her if it was okay.

Megan:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
But-

Joanna Fleming:
We'll ask Linda if it's okay.

Hannah Furst:
We'll ask Linda if it's okay.

Joanna Fleming:
Well thanks for joining us for this cringey convo, Megan!

Megan:
No worries!

Joanna Fleming:
It was a pleasure having you here.

Megan:
Pleasure!

Joanna Fleming:
We like to have an extra team member.

Megan:
Totally! Thanks, guys! Bye!

Hannah Furst:
Just really quickly, Megan is gone, but I did just call Linda to ask if we could tell that story. Could you please, verbatims, tell us what she just said?

Joanna Fleming:
She said as long as you say that you forced it off her-

Hannah Furst:
Yep.

Joanna Fleming:
... and that you were unmanageable.

Hannah Furst:
Yep.

Joanna Fleming:
And that she gave up.

Hannah Furst:
Yep. And then what happened at the hospital?

Joanna Fleming:
And then she said at the hospital, "Now Hannah, what's the moral of the story?"

Hannah Furst:
So you might be getting a little bit of a picture of what kind of a teenager I was.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I didn't realize that you were like that.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, no, I was really ... I was a real rebel.

Joanna Fleming:
Very forceful.

Hannah Furst:
Forceful rebel.

Joanna Fleming:
Well, you learnt your lesson the hard way. [Crosstalk 00:11:57] with petrol in your eye.

Joanna Fleming:
So welcome to our next guest. Dr. Natalie Savin is an optometrist at Eyescan in Toorak.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Hi guys.

Joanna Fleming:
She is joining us today to talk all things eyes. We have just had our cringey convo with Megan about eyes. So we've-

Hannah Furst:
This is the eye episode.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. We've talked all gross stuff with eyes. So we thought we'd start with conjunctivitis.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
So can you tell us what causes conjunctivitis in adults, and how do you treat it?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, absolutely. Well, there are actually multiple causes for conjunctivitis. So generally, when you get a pink, sticky eye, it's worth a check in at an optometrist, just in case it's not quite what you think it is. Generally, the common ones are bacterial. That's your classic gunky, yellow, sticky, glued shut eye in the morning.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But actually, the most contagious form of conjunctivitis is viral. And viral is not treated with antibiotics and requires a different approach. So for that reason, it's always best to just pop your head in and have a look. Viral is super contagious. Often, it will spread from one eye to the other.

Hannah Furst:
Oh yeah, that's happened to me.

Joanna Fleming:
I think I've had that.

Hannah Furst:
Me too!

Joanna Fleming:
Pretty sure I've had that.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, but it's [crosstalk 00:13:11]-

Joanna Fleming:
I think I might have got it from a child.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Often get it from children.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, ew.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But hand-to-hand touch. Hand washing is really important. Just general hygiene, when it comes to viral conjunctivitis, and keeping your distance, is a big one. I generally disinfect my room after a patient leaves.

Joanna Fleming:
Ew! Why is it so contagious?

Dr Natalie Savin:
It's an infectious disease.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
So some things are more infectious than others. And adenovirus tends to be the most common viral conjunctivitis, is particularly infectious.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But there are all sorts of different bacteria that can cause conjunctivitis as well. Sometimes it can be chlamydial, is a common one that won't respond to antibiotics.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh dear!

Dr Natalie Savin:
So if your conjunctivitis isn't going away, again, come and get a check-up. That's probably the best way to [crosstalk 00:13:59]-

Joanna Fleming:
Is that an awkward one to tell someone, that ...?

Dr Natalie Savin:
It's kind of not necessarily what you think.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay!

Dr Natalie Savin:
And it is very, very treatable. If nothing's responding, then yeah, come see us.

Joanna Fleming:
Right. Now we know in the beauty industry that mascara is something that you should change really regularly because it can harbor a lot of bacteria. So what kinds of things can happen if you are using a super old dirty mascara wand?

Dr Natalie Savin:
I suppose you're just increasing your risk of those kinds of infections. All of your lashes open up onto little glands, and the job of those glands is to secrete oils and sebums into the tear film. If one of those glands get blocked up, and particularly with something that's been harboring bacteria, it'll cause things like conjunctivitis, like those big styes that you see.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Dr Natalie Savin:
It can also just cause an allergic reaction, which is super unpleasant.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Now styes, I've had one.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
Have you?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. And I rubbed a gold ring on it and it went away-

Hannah Furst:
What?

Joanna Fleming:
And I thought that was a wives' tale. And then I actually did it and it worked!

Dr Natalie Savin:
I'm from this Russian-Jewish family, and I'm pretty sure that wive tale existed when I was growing up as well.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But it's a wives' tale.

Joanna Fleming:
Really?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
It went away the next day!

Hannah Furst:
What do you mean?

Joanna Fleming:
You rub a gold ring on it.

Hannah Furst:
Like a gold ring ring?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Like finger ring?

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Maybe I'm wrong, but I've not [crosstalk 00:15:25]-

Joanna Fleming:
You don't do it in clinic as a treatment.

Hannah Furst:
I feel like that's not that hygienic.

Joanna Fleming:
I mean, it's probably not but-

Hannah Furst:
Right?

Joanna Fleming:
... it seemed to do the trick.

Hannah Furst:
If you're on the train, and you have your gold ring on and it touches-

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, I would have washed it before I did. This was 10 years ago, probably.

Hannah Furst:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But I will say, generally, these things are self-limiting. Meaning, they will take care of themselves-

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
... quite often. Maybe you got lucky?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I think so.

Joanna Fleming:
And what about sharing products like makeup? Is that a big no-no?

Hannah Furst:
Because we know mascara is a no-no, but I don't think my family ... like the girls in my family know that that's a no-no.

Joanna Fleming:
Really?

Hannah Furst:
No!

Joanna Fleming:
To not share it or to ... throw it out?

Hannah Furst:
To not share mascara.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh!

Hannah Furst:
I don't think anyone that I know would know that.

Joanna Fleming:
Really?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. You just think it's-

Joanna Fleming:
I think you're doubting a lot of people that you know.

Dr Natalie Savin:
I think I read something that ... I don't remember the statistic, but increases your risk of infection by a decent amount, just by sharing different makeup and products.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I would never share my makeup with anyone.

Hannah Furst:
I wouldn't now.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Aren't you guys against it?

Hannah Furst:
What about eye shadow?

Joanna Fleming:
I'd want to disinfect it. It'd spray something over it, like an alcohol or something.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I wouldn't want to be sharing anything, to be honest. But I don't have sisters, so I'm just not in that-

Hannah Furst:
How often should you change your mascara?

Dr Natalie Savin:
I've read different things, and I think it varies from product to product. Obviously, organic kind of products are non-preserved, generally, and you need to change them far, far more often. Most are labeled according to what preservatives they've used. I think the general rule of thumb is about three months. And you girls might know better than me.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Joanna, do you know?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. It's about three to six months. I mean, it obviously depends how much you're using it as well. If you only use your mascara once a week, you can probably get away with a little bit longer. But you'll notice they start to get really crumbly and they just don't do what they were doing when you first bought them. So you kind of know that the formula is-

Hannah Furst:
Done.

Joanna Fleming:
... kind of expiring, because all the things inside it dry out. Because you are pulling a wand out, exposing it to oxygen, and then putting the wand back in. And a lot of people, they pump the wand in, and that just lets more oxygen in and dries out the ingredients. So you probably do want to change it regularly anyway.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I don't count.

Joanna Fleming:
We get so many mascaras sent in to us [crosstalk 00:17:39], we just rotate them in and out.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, we're all guilty of it. But yes, they should be changed probably more often than we all do.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
I remember having lipstick and I had no idea how long I'd had it for. And I remember putting it on and I was like, "God, that smells weird." And it definitely had gone off!

Joanna Fleming:
So I cleaned out my lipstick drawer the other day, and I opened one. It mustn't have been closed properly, and it was moldy on the top of the-

Hannah Furst:
No!

Joanna Fleming:
... lipstick. I was like, "Oh no!" I don't know how that happened.

Hannah Furst:
Lipstick gets a weird smell, when it goes off.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
It smells weird. Not off, but just a ... a weird off-

Joanna Fleming:
Although, I have MAC lipsticks from like-

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, same!

Joanna Fleming:
Years ago!

Hannah Furst:
That my [crosstalk 00:18:16] MAC lipsticks that were like five years old.

Joanna Fleming:
I just want to keep them because they're like sentimental. Like, "Oh, I bought that in Vegas [crosstalk 00:00:18:23]."

Hannah Furst:
And I have like an orange color and then I have one of those pale pink colors. I'm like, "What were you thinking?" Every time I look at it.

Joanna Fleming:
So Hannah is a contact lens wearer. I am not.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, so many questions-

Joanna Fleming:
But I see her rinsing her contact lenses at her desk all the time.

Hannah Furst:
I'm really bad with the contact lens hygiene. Okay, so what I do now ... So when I was younger, we already had this discussion earlier, I couldn't put my hand in my eye and so my mom had to do it for me. And I would wear monthlies.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
I felt like monthlies were not good for my eyes. They didn't feel ... It didn't feel good.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Sure.

Hannah Furst:
They would kind of dry out a lot. Anyway, I then moved to dailies, but I change my dailies every day. Can you use dailies more than once?

Dr Natalie Savin:
No.

Hannah Furst:
No? Okay. Because my mom was like, "Nah, you can use them for two days."

Joanna Fleming:
Linda advice.

Dr Natalie Savin:
No. Dailies, as suggested on the pack-

Hannah Furst:
Is dailies.

Joanna Fleming:
I love the sass there.

Hannah Furst:
I know!

Joanna Fleming:
"As suggested ..."

Dr Natalie Savin:
But, again, everyone stretches it out. And I suppose you're just increasing your risk of a complication. And especially with a contact lens, where you rely on contact lenses for good vision-

Hannah Furst:
Yes, I do.

Dr Natalie Savin:
... play by the rules. If you-

Hannah Furst:
God, it gets expensive!

Dr Natalie Savin:
It can. It can get expensive. And look, it's getting more competitive, I think, because the trend is going more towards daily disposable wear. Purely, because you're lowering your risk of infection. You're taking a medical device out of a sterile packet every morning, straight in the eye, not storing it. You're avoiding kind of protein build-up, which is probably why-

Hannah Furst:
The protein build-up was so painful and I didn't know what was going on!

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, is that for the monthly ones?

Hannah Furst:
So you take the monthlies out, and I didn't know at the time, this was when I'd learned how to put them in myself. Take them out, put them in a container, and then you put them in the back morning in, and it was like stabbing pain.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh!

Dr Natalie Savin:
That doesn't sound right.

Hannah Furst:
It was!

Joanna Fleming:
She's like, "Really? You're not doing it correctly."

Hannah Furst:
Oh my god, no! It was-

Dr Natalie Savin:
Come see us.

Hannah Furst:
It because I wasn't washing them. That's [crosstalk 00:20:27].

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yes, yes. They require much more maintenance. So they need to be cleaned properly and you need to use a good multipurpose solution. You need to remember to change your cases. And monthlies work really well. And some people swear by them and they have absolutely no problems with them. But then-

Joanna Fleming:
I thought you left them in for a month.

Hannah Furst:
I did!

Dr Natalie Savin:
There's some that you can and-

Joanna Fleming:
When do you take them out? While you sleep and everything?

Hannah Furst:
I've done both, I've done both.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, okay.

Hannah Furst:
I've done ones that you stay for a month, and I've done ones where you take them. And I then read it was ... You needed to wash them properly.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
So I started doing that.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, there are some, absolute, they're designed to be slept in. And then there are others that can be worn for a month but not slept in. There are some that can be worn as dailies. There are heaps of different modalities and we kind of fit according to lifestyle.

Hannah Furst:
So for me, I'm lazy. I don't like washing them, so I just chuck them out.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. And why does that not surprise me?

Hannah Furst:
Do you know what the worst thing is? Is I'm in bed, if I forget to take them out, I've like slept in dailies before. And it's like you wake up and you're like, "Oh no!"

Dr Natalie Savin:
You know it's not good.

Hannah Furst:
You know it's not good.

Joanna Fleming:
I know that she's done it when she comes in the next day and she's got her big glasses on.

Hannah Furst:
And you're like, "What's happened?" Yeah, so I actually just take them out in bed and flick them on the floor and then ...

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
And then there's like all these dry contact lenses-

Joanna Fleming:
Oh no! See what I'm dealing with, Natalie?

Hannah Furst:
... and so I have to vacuum!

Dr Natalie Savin:
Hannah, my husband does exactly the same.

Hannah Furst:
Does he? Oh my god, I thought it was just me!

Dr Natalie Savin:
No, I find them dried up-

Joanna Fleming:
How does he get away with that?

Hannah Furst:
Yes!

Dr Natalie Savin:
... contact lenses on our bedside.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, that's me!

Dr Natalie Savin:
Horrible.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my god, I'm so glad someone else does that.

Joanna Fleming:
The husband of an optometrist does it too. Do you wear contacts or glasses?

Dr Natalie Savin:
No. I get away without it.

Joanna Fleming:
Wow! So you've got great vision?

Dr Natalie Savin:
For now.

Joanna Fleming:
So what made you want to be an optometrist? Because I was interested. When I found you, I was like, "Hmm, that's an interesting specialty."

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, how do you get into that?

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Dr Natalie Savin:
I kind of fell into it. It wasn't a calling, I suppose. And I was studying medical science and wanted to do something a little bit more practical. And at the time, a course opened up which allowed me to accelerate the program a little bit, and I took the opportunity.

Joanna Fleming:
Cool!

Dr Natalie Savin:
And it's been good ever since. I fell into a good practice with great people. I work alongside an ophthalmologist-

Joanna Fleming:
Ah, cool!

Dr Natalie Savin:
... and he's wonderful. So we got a good setup.

Joanna Fleming:
Good. Now, I have a lash lift probably every eight weeks. And I recently had a bit of an obsession with eyelash extensions, but I weaned myself off because I was like, "This is just ... I can't keep up with the cost of this." Are you seeing more patients come in with complications from eye services, I guess, like lash lifts and lash extensions? Because I read an article about the increase of mites in lashes-

Hannah Furst:
Oh, what?

Joanna Fleming:
... from people having lash extensions. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Oh!

Dr Natalie Savin:
Those mites you're talking about are called Demodex. Demodex are actually more common than you would think-

Joanna Fleming:
I know we have mites on our face. Is that the same thing?

Dr Natalie Savin:
I actually don't know what [crosstalk 00:23:14] mites-

Hannah Furst:
Sorry, what's a mite?

Joanna Fleming:
Like a bug.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Like a tiny, tiny, tiny [crosstalk 00:23:19]-

Joanna Fleming:
They're all over our face.

Hannah Furst:
Oh great.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But they can cause what we call blepharitis on the eyelashes. So that can either be caused by bacteria or it can be caused by a Demodex mite. So I am seeing a little bit more of that at the base of eyelashes with eyelash extensions, purely because ... I assume they're quite difficult to clean.

Joanna Fleming:
They are.

Dr Natalie Savin:
You probably can't scrub.

Joanna Fleming:
And that's what frustrated me and I was like, "This seems unhygienic and I'm not into it."

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, if you saw it close up, that would be enough to wean you off.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But-

Hannah Furst:
Oh, I have [crosstalk 00:23:53]-

Joanna Fleming:
And I only had them refilled twice, and that was ... I was looking at them and trying to clean them and I was like, "I just can't get in there. And I wonder what it's like for people that have had them refilled for two years straight." So I can imagine what you're seeing.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Some people are really hypersensitive to kind of allergic stuff, so if you put something on your eye, whether it be the product or an eyelash extension, the glue, even the process itself can set off quite an uncomfortable response. Generally, what I'm finding is that things like dry eye disease are much more common with things like eyelash extensions and lash lifts, because it disrupts the tear film.

Joanna Fleming:
Right. And do you see many people having like an allergic reaction to the glue and then coming in to see you guys?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, it has happened on occasion. And I suppose the more extreme version of that is, it causes an ulcer or some sort of abrasion, and that requires pretty urgent treatment because it can scar up and then affect vision.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. That is not good. We don't want that. Now, blue light glasses. I've been looking at it. Because I don't wear glasses, but I think I would probably look good with them.

Hannah Furst:
Also, I just want to get them because my ... I like those aviators. The gold aviators.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh yeah.

Hannah Furst:
And because I'm -6.00, so when they put glass in it, it's like this thick because they can't get it thin enough.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, I know. I've seen your glasses. They're very big.

Hannah Furst:
They're very thick. So I just wanted to get them so I could wear aviators. So, if you say that it's good, then I'm going to do it.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Look, I think heaps more of research needs to go into blue light lenses. Yeah, the research is there, but it's not really strong and it's really young. So a lot of the solid research we have is around what we know is harmful to the eye in that UV spectrum. And I think the focus needs to maybe go off blue light and back onto what we know is harmful UV. And blue light off screens? I think even spending the entire day in front of a screen, you'll still get blue ... more blue light standing outside in the sun.

Hannah Furst:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
So ...

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, is that right?

Dr Natalie Savin:
When you think about it like that, blue light protection is important, and anything we can do to protect ourselves from UV is recommended. But just as important, when you're outside, more important when you're outside, to protect yourself from UV. Having said that, the products are great. Heaps of labs are making amazing products with blue light.

Dr Natalie Savin:
We put it on glasses, especially for students. It can affect certain things, but generally those things are more caused by sitting in front of a laptop and staring at a screen and just getting eye strain.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
I had a really expensive pair of sunglasses, and they were stolen from my car, which I'm still mad about that. So I'm wearing quite a cheap pair of sunglasses. What's the difference between buying a 400 dollar pair of Prada sunglasses compared to a 20 dollar pair from ASOS?

Dr Natalie Savin:
As far as I know, all sunglasses sold in Australia need to meet compliance standards.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
So they will protect you from UV in the same way. Some glasses will be polarized. Polarizing will just cut out more glare, it doesn't block more UV.

Hannah Furst:
I was wondering about the polarized.

Joanna Fleming:
Ah, okay! So interesting.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Your vision might be clearer, especially if you're glare-sensitive. Polarizing can be really useful. But in terms of UV protection, even clear glasses have a UV filter in it. So sunglasses incorporate a tint.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. Oh, that's interesting to know. Well, now I don't feel as bad about my Prada sunglasses.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But again, I don't know if ASOS complied ... to [crosstalk 00:27:28]-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Well, I did buy my Prada ones in Europe as well, so who knows if either of them were compliant?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yeah, to be honest, I'm pretty sure most of them do. And when you sell sunglasses in a shop, for example, like ours, it comes with a tag that it meets compliance standards.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, okay. Because I know that our SPF compliance in Australia is very high, if you're creating a sunscreen. Is it the same with sunglasses?

Dr Natalie Savin:
I believe it is.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yep.

Joanna Fleming:
What is the strangest thing you've ever seen in your time as an optometrist?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Like makeup-related?

Joanna Fleming:
No. Anything. Could be anything gross or weird that someone's done to their eye, or that's happened to their eye.

Dr Natalie Savin:
To be honest, if we're going on topic, I have seen a model. She had a shoot and she came in the next day and she had a staph infection because [crosstalk 00:28:14] of the makeup.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh shit!

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God.

Joanna Fleming:
That is serious.

Dr Natalie Savin:
The makeup artist didn't clean the brushes properly.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my God, that is bad!

Hannah Furst:
Okay. This is why you need to clean your brushes.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes!

Dr Natalie Savin:
So, if I'm going to leave you with anything, it's clean your brushes.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah! Especially if you're a makeup artist. Come on! Wow, that's nasty. So what did you have to do in that instance?

Dr Natalie Savin:
That's a referral to her GP.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
So-

Joanna Fleming:
Have you seen anyone get anything stuck in their eye or ... ?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Contact lenses.

Hannah Furst:
Oh! I actually was going to say my mom, back in the day when contacts were no good ... Well, they weren't as advanced as they are now. She fell asleep in her contact lenses and her eyes were like welded shut the next morning.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my god!

Hannah Furst:
And she actually couldn't open her eyes and was taken to hospital.

Joanna Fleming:
Why does that happen?

Dr Natalie Savin:
Poor thing. I don't know. Maybe that-

Hannah Furst:
These old school [crosstalk 00:29:01]-

Dr Natalie Savin:
... could have been some-

Hannah Furst:
Old school, old school contact lenses! My mom ... This would have been like 40 years ago, maybe longer.

Dr Natalie Savin:
But I have had patients that have come in and they're like, "I don't know if I'm getting my contact lenses out." And I'm like, "I'm sure you are, but let me take a look." And lo and behold, I find like three contact lenses up beneath the upper lid.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh my gosh!

Hannah Furst:
Oh! Okay, I don't know how that happens to people.

Dr Natalie Savin:
They're not going anywhere.

Hannah Furst:
No, no. Because it's happened to me, where it's flipped up under my eye. But I can feel it!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. They don't into your brain or anything, do they?

Dr Natalie Savin:
No, they just get stuck beneath the lid. And I always would assume you'd feel it, as well-

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, you do.

Dr Natalie Savin:
... but apparently, not-

Hannah Furst:
Everyone.

Dr Natalie Savin:
... everyone does.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Dr Natalie Savin:
And especially if people aren't that experienced with contact lens, when they're like, "I just don't know where it went." A tiny and clear, and when you've got vision that requires glasses anyway, I imagine it would be tricky.

Hannah Furst:
I have had it flip under, and I was like, "Oh no, I've hurt my eye in some way and I definitely got it out." Put in another contact lens in, and then all of a sudden, the other one flips under, and you've got two contacts on. It's weird.

Joanna Fleming:
Do you see better with two on?

Hannah Furst:
No!

Dr Natalie Savin:
Much, much worse.

Hannah Furst:
No, worse!

Joanna Fleming:
Like supernatural vision?

Hannah Furst:
That's like if you put contacts in and put glasses over the top. It's like the one-

Joanna Fleming:
I'm just so inexperienced in this area because I don't-

Hannah Furst:
Oh, I'm very experienced.

Joanna Fleming:
... wear either. So I just can't relate.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. But I've got to say dailies changed my life.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I'm really glad that I got onto the dailies.

Joanna Fleming:
Although, I kind of like you with glasses on.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I mean, I want to get laser. I was about to say laser hair removal [crosstalk 00:30:27].

Joanna Fleming:
[crosstalk 00:30:29] had that!

Hannah Furst:
I do!

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. Well thank you, Natalie, for coming in and chatting all things eyes. If anyone wants to see Natalie, she's at Eyescan in Toorak.

Dr Natalie Savin:
Yep, come see us. And thanks for having me, girls.

Joanna Fleming:
Thanks!

Hannah Furst:
Okay. Products We Didn't Know We Needed: Eye Edition. Do you want to get started?

Joanna Fleming:
I do because I recently had my lash extensions removed and it was a very hard time. I'm not trying to be dramatic, but when you've had lash extensions on, and you get them off and you're like bold ... it's quite difficult to adjust. So I have a pair of lashes, like strip lashes, that I rely on. They're the MODELROCK Signature Lashes in Wispy Flower. They're natural looking, as in like, "You know you're wearing fake lashes, but not in like an over-the-top way."

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
So I'd recommend them for you, for your sister's wedding.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah!

Joanna Fleming:
I don't think you're going to be able to do them on yourself, so ...

Hannah Furst:
Why? I've got some time to practice!

Joanna Fleming:
Strip lashes are really hard to put on.

Hannah Furst:
I've put them on before!

Joanna Fleming:
Have you?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
Really? Well?

Hannah Furst:
I trim them, and then ... I mean, it takes an hour, probably, to put them on.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, it does. And then if you've [beep] that up, you've got to do your whole makeup again, basically.

Hannah Furst:
But I really want to get good at them, because I like to do them more for events.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes! Yeah. So if I have an event on-

Hannah Furst:
How much?

Joanna Fleming:
They're like 11 dollars.

Hannah Furst:
Okay.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
That's all right.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Everyone tells me I'm too bougie.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, I'm going bargain today, so that's okay.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. So I like to wear these lashes for events. I don't wear them daily. I'm not going to put a strip lash on to go to work, but these are my go-to event lashes. And I just feel like I look so much better with lashes on. So what's yours?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I agree. So we had a couple ... one person say like, "I want to hear some more bargain products."

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
And we're all for bougie and bargain. And I think it's really ... Like as if anyone in their makeup bag has like ... every single item is expensive. So for me, if I didn't work at Adore, and I didn't get sent mascaras, the one product that I would go bargain on is mascara.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Always.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
You have to replace it so often, it goes dry-

Joanna Fleming:
They dry out, they're crumbly.

Hannah Furst:
... it's just like, seriously? I do wear mascaras that are like 40 dollars plus, now, probably because I don't pay for them or I get a discount on them.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
But if I wasn't paying full price? But that's just me. Some people like to invest in a really expensive mascara for whatever reason. For me, I'd go bargain on the mascara.

Joanna Fleming:
What's your bargain one?

Hannah Furst:
So mine's the Maybelline Great Lash Mascara in [crosstalk 00:32:57]-

Joanna Fleming:
That's the classic.

Hannah Furst:
... which is actually like a classic and I-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Makeup artists use that.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. And I have been using that, and had been using that, well, well before I started working at Adore Beauty. It's 12.95 dollars, it's seriously-

Joanna Fleming:
Bargain.

Hannah Furst:
... bargain. I would recommend, for myself with oily skin, waterproof. Look, I'm having this love/hate relationship with mascara because I have to wear waterproof or tubing because of how oily my skin is, but it is what it is. But you can just get the Blackest Black, which is not waterproof.

Hannah Furst:
But I did wear that one the other night, maybe we can put a photo up on the stories when we release this episode. It was like midnight and it ... like, I was crying in the club.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes, [crosstalk 00:33:36]. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
We've talked about that story. So that was when I was not wearing waterproof, because my skin is just ... If I'm dancing, I need waterproof. I'm sweating like a pig. So-

Joanna Fleming:
I walked today, you'll be surprised. I'm also wearing a Maybelline mascara.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, you are!

Joanna Fleming:
It's a new one, though.

Hannah Furst:
Which I'm surprised!

Joanna Fleming:
I don't even know if it's out yet, but it's coming up very soon. It's like a Valentine's Day release, I think.

Hannah Furst:
I'm surprised because you're not like ... you're not much .... Oh, you do! Actually, you do all-bougie skincare, but you do wear designer brands-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
... makeup-

Joanna Fleming:
I've got a lot of bargain stuff.

Hannah Furst:
... Maybelline makeup. Yeah, you do.

Joanna Fleming:
People underestimate me. I've got the Falsies Lash Lift mascara on today. I did have a lash lift last night.

Hannah Furst:
They look good! Yeah!

Joanna Fleming:
And I think it's just a really nice lengthening and separating mascara. I wouldn't say it's a thickening one.

Hannah Furst:
Yep.

Joanna Fleming:
I'd say it's more lengthening and separating, but it does look really nice. When I've got my lash lift, I'm like, "Yes, this is for me."

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So the Maybelline one that I use is a thickening mascara, which I like. I-

Joanna Fleming:
And a lot of makeup artists use that because they have to use a disposable mascara wand to do their clients, and they're replacing mascaras all the time. So imagine them trying to buy like a YSL mascara.

Hannah Furst:
Are you a bottom lash girl?

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
I am like, if I go out at night, I'm like ... I like those doll eyes where I like put a shit-

Joanna Fleming:
You shouldn't.

Hannah Furst:
Why?

Joanna Fleming:
That's why you're getting [beep] panda eyes!

Hannah Furst:
But no, no-

Joanna Fleming:
You shouldn't put it on your bottom lashes ever!

Hannah Furst:
Since I've been using tubing mascara and waterproof-

Joanna Fleming:
Okay, you're right.

Hannah Furst:
... which I wasn't, it's totally fine.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
It doesn't come off!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Can't even get it off with water!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, that's true.

Hannah Furst:
As if sweat will get it off!

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
No, I love really overdoing the bottom eyelashes.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I'm big into that.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep.

Hannah Furst:
Cool.

Joanna Fleming:
Cool.

Hannah Furst:
All right. Well, that was our big eye episode.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep. Next week: teeth.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Fleming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast, so if you can leave us a review, that would be much appreciated.

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