Episode 48: Got Maskne? We're Here To Help!

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

After receiving a desperate DM from a listener, we're sharing all the ways you can manage maskne, which tbh, we never thought would be a thing but here we are. Shout out to all the frontline workers looking after the community.

Here's our article on maskne with product recommendations.

We summarise Dr Sebaratnam's tips in this ep - plus we share an additional game-changing tip courtesy of Dr Pimple Popper herself.

Here's Hannah's product suggestion for spraying your mask:

Dermalogica Clear Start Breakout Clearing All Over Toner

Plus here's where you can shop the Sensori+ Mask Sanitiser and Shhh Silk Face Mask.

Alcohol VS Skin

Since we're already talking about what it's like being in lockdown, this seems like a natural segue.

What actually happens to your skin after a big night? A few too many cocktails? A bottle of wine? Bondi dermatologist Dr Phil Tong joins us to explain the effects alcohol can have on your skin and on different skin concerns. He also busts a myth for us on facial flushing.

You can find Dr Phil Tong on Instagram here.

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: BaBylissPRO Nose and Ear Trimmer

Hannah: PCA Skin Perfecting Neck & Decollete

Read our disclaimer here.

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst

Guests: Dr Phil Tong

We share some tips for dealing with 'maskne'. Plus! Dr Phil Tong joins us to explain how alcohol can effect your skin.

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 48 Transcript - 'Got Maskne? We're Here To Help!'

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ the podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm your host, Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your co-host Hannah Furst.

Joanna Fleming:
You know what I thought we really need to do some recommendations for other people that are living in stage four right now.

Hannah Furst:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
Because I watched a show on Netflix on the weekend and I absolutely loved it. And I feel like everybody should watch this show. And I'm probably really late to the party here. Because I know it was on the ABC, but it's called Love on the Spectrum. And it's about people with autism spectrum disorder and them learning to date, because communication is quite challenging for them and understanding social cues and stuff like that.

Joanna Fleming:
And this series is just so pure and it just made me feel so happy watching it. It's a really feel good show, I was just giggling the whole way through it because they're just so sweet, and knowing that there's resources for adults with autism, because as children you get a lot of support with autism, but not as much as adults. And in this series it really highlights how much they want to meet someone, and have a partner, but don't have the skills to be able to have a relationship.

Joanna Fleming:
There's this woman that goes to him and does one-on-one sessions, on how to have a conversation, and how to tell someone that you like them. And it really highlights disabilities of all kinds in a really positive way. And it's just such a feel good show. And I really, really recommend watching it if you are in lockdown, or even if you're not. Even if you're somewhere else in Australia, put it on on the weekend and have a watch. Because it really made me very happy. But you also have a Netflix recommendation, Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
I do. Mine's Indian Matchmaker, which is on Netflix and actually look, the whole show wasn't my vibe. But the person on the show that was my vibe was Aparna.

Joanna Fleming:
You said [inaudible 00:01:48].

Hannah Furst:
I know, so I think we should put in some audio here of what she says, which is my favorite line of the whole show.

Aparna:
I see some of my friends and they're with their husbands all the time. And I'm like, "don't you hate that person? Like you see them all the time." They're like, "they're my husband." And I'm like, "Oh, do we have to see our husbands all the time? Is that a thing that people have to do because I'd rather not, I think."

Hannah Furst:
I really feel like she is my vibe.

Joanna Fleming:
Same, totally relate to that. I think people that are married will probably relate more because we don't have to see husbands at all.

Hannah Furst:
Sorry, I haven't got, I'm not the whole way through, I think I'm three or four episodes in. And obviously because we can't travel at the moment and India is one of my favorite places that I've ever traveled. So, it just gives me like a reminder of that. I've also got a podcast recommendation here, Jo.

Joanna Fleming:
Well, we actually should probably do this like regularly and recommend podcasts that we listen to. So I actually stumbled across this podcast because they tagged me in an Instagram story and I saw that they had a new episode and I was like, "I'm just going to have a quick listen to this and see what it's about because the episode was called "expectations versus reality," the podcast, I think it's called Sunday Brunch.

Joanna Fleming:
And it was a really good episode around just re-aligning your expectations for your life, I guess. I think I'm really guilty of comparing my life to my friends. And a lot of my friends are married or like thinking about having kids and like our conversations often revolve around them. Like, "when are you going to try and get pregnant?" And I'm like, "Whoa, I'm so not there." So, I think it was a really good episode around just not being too hard on yourself, especially during this time as well. Hannah, we were talking earlier, like it's just... it hasn't been great for us in terms of dating.

Hannah Furst:
Oh yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I thought it was a really good episode and they did have some awesome episodes also further down, but I haven't listened to them yet, but that's my podcast recommendation for this week. Have you listened to any podcasts that you want to recommend?

Hannah Furst:
I am obsessed with the Rich Roll podcast as you know.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
I'm really into like, I don't practice it, but I'm really into like my wellness. Yeah. So I really like Dr. Michael Greger. I'm reading his book at the moment. It's 23 hours long. Actually, they go... Audible's actually one of my favorite things that I'm doing at the moment, but...

Joanna Fleming:
Yes, you've had a new interest.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, so Michael Greger, he wrote a book called "How Not to Die" and he's all about plant-based medicine. He's all about like... we love our science based stuff. So he's all about science in terms of health and nutrition and disease prevention. So yeah, there's an episode called "How to Survive the Pandemic with Dr. Michael Greger," but speaking of podcasts and dating podcasts, though.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes? You've got an update for me?

Hannah Furst:
Did you like my little interview with Dan Andrews?

Joanna Fleming:
I did. I really liked that interview with Dan Andrews, which is if you want to go and look at it, it's on Hannah's Instagram. Is that an intro to the dating podcast? Is that like a little taste?

Hannah Furst:
I think it's a little taste of what's to come.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay, great.

Hannah Furst:
Because basically what happened was I've been in my head and I'm sure other people, single people feel like this, what the hell is an intimate partner? So anyway, Dan Andrew has all the answers on my Instagram. That video took me six hours last night to put together, so.

Joanna Fleming:
You weren't doing anything else. So, it was a good use of your time. Anyway, what is on today's episode.

Hannah Furst:
So on today's episode, we are actually... I'm answering a listener question for our cringy convo around "mask-ne," which is the new term of 2020. And then we're chatting to dermatologist, Dr. Phil Tong on... also relevant to 2020 alcohol and how it affects your skin and the products we didn't know we needed, of course.

Hannah Furst:
All right. So today's cringy convo is a request from a listener and I just thought her message was super cute. And I'm sure like anyone that has to wear a mask during their work day would totally relate to this. So she said, can I beg you to do a podcast on pandemic skincare? I'm a midwife and these clinical masks are absolutely, bleep this out Matthew, --king up my skin. I work to support my bougie skincare routine and I just don't know what to do anymore. It's so upsetting. Anyway, she said she wants our help. And she signed off with "please, please, please, please."

Joanna Fleming:
It's actually funny that you read that out because my sister in law's sister, so not technically my sister in law, but like once removed, she messaged me the other day and she works at the Royal Melbourne as a nurse. And she said, everybody on our ward wants to know what to do about their skin. Because she was breaking out. They're obviously wearing a lot of PPE every day. And working in healthcare often, you don't get breaks. Like you're just so flat out that you don't get to take your lunch break, like you would in an office job, and you're not getting that break from the PPE like we're being advised to. So this will be a great episode for her and everybody on the ward at the Royal Melbourne. So Eleanor, this episode is for you.

Hannah Furst:
And also, speaking of the Royal Melbourne, it's probably a good little shout out right now is that in the next, in the coming four weeks, we will be live streaming from the Royal Melbourne hospital on our Facebook page as a bit of a PSA for Victorians. Keep an eye on our Facebook page and share with your friends, please. Because it's a really important message and we all just want to get the F out of lockdown as soon as possible.

Hannah Furst:
So, but anyway. So, I have been telling people that have been messaging me about it. We have a really in depth article by our senior editor, Amy Clark, she interviewed a dermatologist on this exact subject and she's also recommended five products under $30. So what we're going to do is we're going to put a link to the... in the episode notes, to that article. So please go check that out. It's got way more information than we can get through in five minutes in a cringy convo.

Hannah Furst:
The dermatologist, she interviewed said that tight masks may lead to blockage of the pores, creating an environment that promotes the development of acne. So that is why people are experiencing more breakouts when they're wearing their mask. And I wore a mask for five hours, once. I started... and I woke up the next day with pimples around my chin.

Hannah Furst:
So I can't even sort of imagine what people are experiencing having to wear their masks all day.

Joanna Fleming:
Absolutely.

Hannah Furst:
Basically, we're going to summarize a few tips here. There's also one more tip that I found on Tik-Tok, courtesy of Dr. Pimple Popper. Basically, if you're not already, the dermatologist recommends to use ingredients like salicylic acid a niacinamide. And I actually responded to the person asking this question with that, and I hadn't even read the article, I was like, "oh, have you tried salicylic acid and niacinamide?" Which shows me how far I've come it must be [inaudible 00:08:30].

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, good for you.

Hannah Furst:
I'll come back to a recommendation on the salicylic acid when we get to the Tik-Tok, because that includes the salicylic acid toner that I really highly recommend. In terms of niacinamide, my favorite is ASAP's Super B.

Joanna Fleming:
I thought you liked Aspect B17. I thought that was your fave.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, I like both.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay, yeah. The ASAP one's my fave.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I just like the texture of it.

Joanna Fleming:
Same.

Hannah Furst:
I really love that silky, silky...

Joanna Fleming:
Also, I feel like that one's maybe a little bit more soothing for irritated skin.

Hannah Furst:
So what we'll do is we'll link the two, the salicylic acid product and the niacinamide, we'll link those in the episode notes, if you're interested. But, aside from that use a gentle cleanser and like a soothing moisturizer. You like the La Roche-Posay Toleriane, is that right?

Joanna Fleming:
I do really like that one and that's what I would definitely recommend during this time. But also the Mesoestetic fast skin repair, I think would be perfect for people that are wearing masks all day.

Hannah Furst:
So good.

Joanna Fleming:
Because it almost creates a barrier as well. So even if you wanted to use that on your skin before you put all your PPE on, that might be a good idea as well.

Hannah Furst:
And if you're on the bougie side of things, I actually use the SkinCeuticals blemish and age defense. If I'm getting my period and I'm starting to get breakouts around my chin and my neck, I'll always use that as a spot treatment. It's a serum, it's got a really nice texture. So I usually will use that one, but you know...

Joanna Fleming:
We can't all be bougie bitches.

Hannah Furst:
We can't. Yeah, totally.

Joanna Fleming:
So, as we mentioned, it can be really hard when you're working in a healthcare environment to actually take your breaks. I know that we wrote some notes down here that the American Academy of dermatology recommend taking a 15 minute break every four hours from wearing your PPE. But we know that in some instances that's not really possible. You don't get the luxury of taking a break, every single shift. But I did say to my sister-in-law's sister, I'm just going to call her my sister-in-law cause she pretty much is, she's just not married to my brother.

Hannah Furst:
That's a bit weird, I was about to say "yeah, they're both your sister-in-law?"

Joanna Fleming:
Sister wives. So I recommended to her, I said, "if you do get to take your breaks, just take some Bioderma to work, put it in your locker or your bag or wherever you're keeping your stuff and try and cleanse your skin in those breaks and then just apply something like an niacinamide or a HAMB5 or something to your skin just to give back to it and rehydrate it without putting anything too heavy on. You're just cleaning the skin, taking it back again and then replenishing moisture before you put everything back on. So, that was my recommendation to her. But totally get it. You can't always take your breaks, but if you can, try and do that in between is my recommendation.

Hannah Furst:
The other tip was to wear less or preferably no makeup.

Joanna Fleming:
Totally.

Hannah Furst:
I think this is just universally kind of good at particularly working from home and you don't have to wear makeup almost, you've got important Zoom calls. I don't even bother for those, but. If you're wearing a mask, the makeup can block pores even without a mask. So the mask will just compound that.

Joanna Fleming:
Yep, definitely, just don't worry about the makeup we're in the middle of the pandemic. Like honestly, it's the last thing people are worrying about is what you look like with or without makeup on. So just take a break from it for now, if you can. On that as well, changing your mask, if you notice any dampness and if you're using reusable masks, making sure you're washing them daily as well. This is just like the basics. This is aiming just for skin care, but that's obviously what everyone in the healthcare space is recommending that you change your disposable masks regularly and any reusable ones are washed daily to make sure that it's hygienic.

Hannah Furst:
And the last tip was when you get home, wash your face and apply your skincare as soon as possible. Probably a pretty good routine at the moment would be use a gentle cleanse a salicylic acid, either toner or serum, follow that with some niacinamide and then add on the top your soothing moisturizer or something like Mesoestetic's fast skin repair.

Hannah Furst:
But I think what we both said, Jo, was that it's probably inevitable that if you are wearing a mask all day, every day, you may end up with some breakouts.

Joanna Fleming:
100%. Without removing the thing that's causing the irritation or the breakout. You can't be guaranteed to completely get rid of that just with changing around your skincare. I think there has to be an element of like, "Oh, it's going to happen, but I can do my best to keep it under control."

Hannah Furst:
Yes. Which actually brings us to Dr. Pimple Popper. She recently did a Tik-Tok on this very subject and I thought the tip was seriously game changing. I was like, "why haven't I thought of this before?" It's so simple. So she recommends spraying your mask with salicylic acid solution and fan drying it before putting it on.

Joanna Fleming:
Genius.

Hannah Furst:
Genius. So firstly, my first thought was, remember when I had that whole idea of if you put the spray nozzle onto...

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, for your "back-ne."

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, for my "back-ne," I was like, "oh my God guys, genius." I'm going to get the Alpha H clear skin tonic and put a spray nozzle on the top.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
And then it came to my attention that Dermalogica already have one with the spray nozzle. So, I was like, "I'm not really a genius after all."

Joanna Fleming:
What, product is it? What Dermalogica product is it?

Hannah Furst:
It's the Dermalogica clear start breakout clearing all-over toner. And at the moment it's actually discounted on site at the moment at Adore Beauty it's $26.40, which I actually think is pretty affordable.

Joanna Fleming:
It's actually really affordable.

Hannah Furst:
So I would really recommend something like that. I mean, you can use it as your toner as well and then put niacinamide over the top. So it's kind of like a jewel product. So I would... and do you know what? You could actually use it on your "back-ne" as well.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
It's actually probably better to use that for your "back-ne."

Joanna Fleming:
Double whammy.

Hannah Furst:
And I have, since I saw this tip, I have been spraying my mask before going out for a walk, but I've been using the sensory mask sanitizer, which actually helps. See I'm less concerned about the acne, I'm more concerned about the putrid breath.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
I have to smell in like my own putrid... after like an hour walk. It's just like stinks of my...

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, you know what I do. I have a mint in my mouth when I go for a walk.

Hannah Furst:
And so I actually found that that mask sanitizer really helps me.

Joanna Fleming:
Because that's actually got a mint smell. I think it's got peppermint oil in it.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, deodorize like that. Look, it can't just be me that is almost vomiting in their mask at the smell of their own breath. The worst, Jo, is in the morning when I wake up, I don't have a shower or brush my teeth before I get a coffee so...

Joanna Fleming:
Brush your teeth then so I put my mask on.

Hannah Furst:
... and I go down to the coffee shop. It reminds me of if you have a friend over and they want to get down to business in the morning and it just makes me sick.

Joanna Fleming:
Actually on masks, by the way, I did get an email earlier that we will be stocking the silk masks. I know that a lot of people are still wearing the surgical ones, but if you want something that you can reuse, we're going to have the silk ones onsite very soon or they'll already be live by the time this episode comes out. So yeah, but also massive thank you to the healthcare workers. You know, anyone working in hospitals.

Hannah Furst:
Seriously.

Joanna Fleming:
I did say something the other day that like the cleaners and the orderlies and stuff that work in the hospitals don't get as much recognition, but they're still fully down to their PPE as well. And so obviously big shout out to everybody that is working in a hospital or healthcare setting at the moment, because without you, where would we be? So good luck with your skin. We hope that this helped you and share it around with everyone on your wall.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. So for today's topic, we have [inaudible 00:16:22] dermatologist, Dr. Phil Tong, joining us. Welcome Phil.

Dr. Phil Tong:
Pleasure to be here.

Joanna Fleming:
It's our pleasure. Now, Hannah, I posted on my story the other night I was holding a glass of rose and you responded and you said, is that wine that I see? And usually I'm not a big drinker, so you were like, "what is going on?" Now that is just kind of reflective of being in stage four lock down here in Victoria, I think. And a lot of people I'm feeling are drinking more throughout this period, I think. I'm sure other people can relate to that. Hannah, are you the same? Have you been getting on the wines at night?

Hannah Furst:
No, not during the week. But yeah, Friday night we have our Adore Beauty drinks on a Friday. So I'm always there at 5:00 PM.

Joanna Fleming:
Ready to go?

Hannah Furst:
Ready to go. So, I think let's get into the important questions. Alcohol versus skin. I think all of us, including myself, have looked in the mirror after a big night and we've noticed our skin isn't looking the best. It's kind of like that deathly look. Can you tell us what effect alcohol has on the skin in the short term and in the longterm?

Dr. Phil Tong:
Certainly. I do find that patients who do have a big night out do tend to get breakouts the following day or the next for the following few days. So certainly alcohol can have detrimental effects on the skin, particularly with, with relation to skin dryness. It can cause the skin to be more dry and you can certainly get more breakouts. So the short answer is indeed alcohol certainly can have short and long term effects on the skin.

Joanna Fleming:
And in terms of inflammation, because I think there is a link as well between alcohol and inflammation as well, does that mean that conditions like acne or rosacea, for example, can be flared up by having a few cocktails? And how does that relate to the flushing that some people experience when they're drinking?

Dr. Phil Tong:
It's really great that you observed that certainly conditions like rosacea, which is a very baizoactive facial eruption. It can certainly cause worsening of the rosacea and skin inflammation. I did mention before how alcohol can also cause skin dryness and when the skin is dry the immune system kicks in and then starts to ramp things up and you can get, sometimes you can get eczemas after a big night out. So, indeed there is a close link between alcohol and skin inflammation. Although, it's not very well studied, unfortunately, but certainly speaking from my patients experience conditions such as acne and rosacea certainly can flare up. So I do recommend keeping these to a moderation for patients with these conditions.

Joanna Fleming:
I use that as an excuse for why I don't really drink much, but I just don't really like drinking alcohol, but that's my excuse because I've got rosacea.

Hannah Furst:
But you do say that Jo, you're like, "oh no, I just don't like the way alcohol makes my skin look." And I'm like, "really?"

Joanna Fleming:
That's how seriously I take my skin care.

Hannah Furst:
You're serious.

Joanna Fleming:
Now, I don't know if it's a myth, but I've read a theory that taking an anti histamine before you drink, can reduce flushing in those that are prone to it. Because I've seen people before that have no other flushing concerns and then when they're drinking, they'll go bright red.

Dr. Phil Tong:
A great question. And here's a MythBuster moment, it actually works.

Joanna Fleming:
Really?

Dr. Phil Tong:
Absolutely it works. And there've been research published in medical journals in the eighties, demonstrating that oral antihistamines, reduces that facial flushing when drinking alcohol. And even more recently, the use of topical medications that are used in rosacea, I might add, to help prevent the flushing effect from alcohol. But, a word of caution, sometimes taking oral antihistamines can mask the damaging effects of alcohol. So, my advice is to best not to combine these medications with alcohol. I'd rather my patients know how much they're drinking and just try to limit the amount of alcohol intake they're having rather than masking it with a medication using foundation with a green tint can help master redness. Particularly if you find that it is... does show with alcohol. But I think, Joanna, your comment about explaining to your friends to say that, "you know, it doesn't go well with my skin," is a perfect excuse to just keep it to a minimum.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, that's what I'm going with.

Hannah Furst:
For those out there, I guess, the message of moderation is really good. But yeah, there's obviously going to be people that aren't willing to cut out alcohol altogether, despite possibly having some skin conditions. Can you tell us, are there types of alcohol that are okay and which ones rake the most havoc on our skin?

Dr. Phil Tong:
Although, I don't have any scientific evidence to answer your question. Some may argue that red wine being high in antioxidants may be better for your skin...

Hannah Furst:
I was hoping you would say that.

Dr. Phil Tong:
... rich in compounds, such as resveratrol, which is an anti aging compound, but there is no real safe alcohol when it comes to skin. In terms of alcohols, which are potentially damaging, full strength beers. Stuff with a high sugar content can certainly make skin worse and dehydrate the skin even more. So be wary of that. So if there was a preferred alcohol to recommend maybe a glass or two of a red and limit it at that.

Hannah Furst:
Very happy with that. I only drink red wine. So good to know. We know after a recent episode that we did on vitamin C, that antioxidants help to protect against free radical damage. Can using a product like Avends antioxidant defense serum which has vitamin C and E, reverse the effects of a big night out?

Dr. Phil Tong:
I'm not sure how much the cream will do to prevent or mitigate the damaging effects of alcohol, but certainly doing everything you can after a big night out to protect your skin would be ideal. And hence using products that do contain antioxidants, peptides, would be helpful. I mean, there are other ingredients as well, just to help calm the skin down such as niacinamide. We talked about dehydration as well. So hyaluronic acid topicals are also could be helpful in this setting, but I think the key message is to stay hydrated. Make sure you drink plenty of water prior to a night out and space your drinks out with plenty of water in between. And I think that would be a great way to keep your skin looking good the day after.

Joanna Fleming:
Hannah and I said at the side of isolation that we were going to try and drink more water, but I don't think for either of us that has happened, I'm having like one glass of water a day, which is terrible. Can you explain the importance of staying hydrated in general? Not just when we're drinking, but how much water should we actually be drinking to notice the effects on the skin?

Dr. Phil Tong:
I think that's an excellent question. I think our... all the cells in our skin require water. And the skin is one of the most active or most metabolic cells that we have in our skin and actively need nutrition and water is one of the best ways to do that. And I would recommend at least three liters of water a day, keep a water bottle at work. You know, even after a big night out, I make sure I drink at least, if I can, half a liter of water before I go to bed. Because I feel much better the following day.

Joanna Fleming:
See, I try and get on the waters while I'm still out. Like if I've been drinking, I know when to stop and I'm like, "no, I'm going to start drinking water now." So I do try and do that when I'm drinking. But in general day-to-day, I'm really bad with drinking water. And I blame my Mom because she always had cordial in the fridge when we were kids. And now I just start like drinking water and I really struggle with it.

Hannah Furst:
Well I actually, talking about that, I actually do drink like a heap of water before bed if I've had a few drinks. Even just one glass of wine, as I've gotten into my thirties, like I need to have at least half a liter before bed. Are there any supplements, I guess you could take? Jo, you had maybe suggested marine collagen, but is there anything you could take before or after drinking that might A, help with your skin, but secondary may help with the hangover?

Dr. Phil Tong:
I mean, there's obviously no studies to investigate this. But... it would be very interesting study, but certainly those micronutrients that you mentioned before, the electrolytes, and even Marine collagen, they all help to provide nutrition to the skin. It certainly can help keep the skin hydrated. And that's certainly has been demonstrated in clinical trials that it helps skin hydration with collagen, but that was more in the aesthetic space and hasn't really been tested after a night out. So I can't be sure whether or not it would have the same effect, but certainly if you want to make sure it's in your breakfast smoothie, the following morning, as opposed to a Macca's Coke, then that would be ideal.

Joanna Fleming:
Well, I guess, the moral of the story here is drink in moderation, stay hydrated and tell people you have rosacea if you're not up for a big night. Thanks so much for your time today, Dr. Phil Tong, it was a pleasure talking to you.

Dr. Phil Tong:
Thank you for having me.

Hannah Furst:
Jo, I really am quite upset that you got this product sent to you because this is like, you have no idea how bad my nose hair is. So...

Joanna Fleming:
No, okay. So everyone that listens to this podcast and they're really loyal to it will remember when we had our noses waxed on air, if you haven't listened to that episode yet, I don't know what episode that was. How long ago was that?

Hannah Furst:
Back when we were recording in the studio.

Joanna Fleming:
Back when we were in the studio. Anyway, that was a long time ago, but we did have our noses waxed on air, but we both have hairy noses. So after we did that noise waxing episode, I tried to find the nose trimmer at Kmart and I could not get it. I tried the one in Northkit. I tried the one in Moonee Ponds. I tried one in Brunswick, could not get it anywhere. It was sold out everywhere. And I'm like, "was that us?" Or from that episode? Did people go out and buy nose trimmers? Is this some kind of like domino effect or something?

Joanna Fleming:
Anyway. So we got these Babyliss nose and ear trimmers on our door. And these have actually been online for quite a while. And Micah had a sample in the office and I was like, "okay, that sample is mine. I will have that." So this, I don't have hairy ears. My dad has hairy ears so at some point maybe I'll get hairy ears later in life. But at the moment it's just the hairy nose. And as we spoke about, on that episode, I feel like my side profile, you can see the little black hairs that stick out of my nose and I'm quite paranoid about it. And I usually trim them and I'm not game enough to wax them myself at home because I've seen some videos that have just not gone to plan, like where people have used q-tips like cotton tips and then have ripped them out and the cotton's just stayed in there so they can't get the wax out.

Joanna Fleming:
So, I have been using this nose trimmer. It has a little battery that comes with it. If it runs out of battery, you just replace it. Obviously it's not one that you charge up, but yeah, it's got a little detachable head that you take off and you empty the hair out and that's pretty much it. It just like gets rid of all the hair in your nose.

Hannah Furst:
You have now got me into a bit of a black hole.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah?

Hannah Furst:
So my dad would love this too.

Joanna Fleming:
Me and your dad have that in common.

Hannah Furst:
So, but he was asking the other day about whether Adore had clippers. because he, okay, so my mom...

Joanna Fleming:
Oh yeah, we do.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. But my mom tried to cut his hair the other day and he's like, "look what Linda did." And I was like, "Oh my God." It was like all little bald patches. It was the worst.

Joanna Fleming:
I would not trust Linda to cut my hair.

Hannah Furst:
And he goes, "what, what?" And I'm like, "Dad..."

Joanna Fleming:
She wouldn't have cared, though. She'd be like, "it looks good."

Hannah Furst:
She's like, "I tried." So he said to me, "do you have clippers that I could use on my hair to do a better job?" So I'm just having a look. They've got these like gold.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Ah, maybe I need to get him these.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, you should. We, we actually got heaps of like tools and different things to use. Like at the start of when this all started happening, we got heaps, more of those kinds of tools. So, that's when we got the nose trimmer, we've had it for ages, but I just didn't get my hands on it until recently and it's a game changer, I tell you what. If you get a hairy nose...

Hannah Furst:
Seriously.

Joanna Fleming:
... a nose trimmer with change your life.

Hannah Furst:
30 bucks as well. Like that's pretty good.

Joanna Fleming:
I mean, the Kmart one's like 10, I think, but still. Anyway, that's me. So what's your product you didn't know you needed today?

Hannah Furst:
So, I've basically... my face and all of that pigmentation I used to have in sunspots, whatever else. But what I'm finding is that my chest doesn't quite match my face now. And I've got like, it's just like when I take a photo of like my face and my chest and I'm like, "but my face is like so nice and smooth now and I've got no brown, like [inaudible 00:29:16] and then my chest has got all these sunspots on it.

Hannah Furst:
So I'm actually at the moment, I've become like really obsessed at night. With alternating vitamin C on my chest with like an exfoliating serum. And then what I'm popping over the top is the PCA skin perfecting neck and... decolletage? Is that how you say it?

Joanna Fleming:
Is it meant to be French and like "deco-lah?" I don't know.

Hannah Furst:
Anyway, basically it's got concentrated blend of actives and it treats uneven skin, dark spots, but also fine lights. So I have been using that. So I have been putting a serum... so basically it says on the... how to use it is like, "add your serum first and then add this over the top." It's got some really nice ingredients. So it's got retinol... actually, should I be using it? Yeah, I think it's fine. It's my chest... it's not your face. So I think...

Joanna Fleming:
Are you using sunscreen?

Hannah Furst:
No, I'm not, I'm wearing jumpers with those hoodies every day.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
Like literally there's no chance the sun...

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
I find my chest gets a lot less irritated so I can put any serum on my chest. So, I'll put a vitamin C or something like a really concentrated, I guess, serum underneath. But then I'll add this over the top. And this one has retinol. It's got peptides, hyaluronic acid and antioxidants.

Hannah Furst:
There are some good ingredients.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
So, I think that if you're looking for like specifically something for your neck and your... how do you say it? Your chest?

Joanna Fleming:
Decolletage?

Hannah Furst:
Decolletage. Yeah, this is a really good one. Actually someone sent me a DM, it was the cutest DM. They were like, this is going to sound really weird, but I really like your decolletage, what do you use? I know.

Joanna Fleming:
I never heard that compliment before.

Hannah Furst:
I've never had anyone compliment my decolletage. See, for me, I look at my decolletage and I'm like, "it's so sun damaged." It really like upsets me that I did that to myself.

Joanna Fleming:
In a lot of older women as well, you can tell when they've used like sunscreen on their faces quite religiously through their lives. And then if they're sun damaged across the chest and arms and everywhere else, but their face is, it looks 10 years younger.

Hannah Furst:
And you have a look at someone like J.Lo, who has the most beautiful skin and doesn't have, from what I can tell, doesn't have like any sun damage on her body.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, she's also a millionaire though. So, keep that in mind.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I get that. What I will say about her though, in interviews that I've read with her is that she is like very anti the sun and she doesn't sun bake and doesn't put her body in the sun. And I think, yeah. And I guess she's a millionaire, yes. But she probably also has also been very sun smart throughout her life.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Anyway, that's mine.

Joanna Fleming:
Cool. Well, I actually had another thing that I wanted to add on here as my product I didn't know I needed. So technically I'm doing like another one today, but I had to share this because remember how we did that episode on blisters.

Hannah Furst:
Yes.

Joanna Fleming:
And I mentioned that Compeed blister stick that someone had mentioned to me in a DM, never used it before, but that was her recommendation. So I bought these new balance runners, right? They're really cool wore them to walk around the river.

Joanna Fleming:
They absolutely cut up the back of my feet, but I was walking home thinking like, "I need to stop because this is hurting my feet so much." Took the shoes off, it's like fully cut into the back of my feet. I'm like in so much pain. Anyway. So I was like, I'm going to get these blister things because I looked them up online and they have like colloidal technology and colloidal silver and stuff like that is used in wound healing. So I thought if I use that on the back of my foot where it's like cut open, it should help to heal it quicker. And then I can break the shoes in. And so I put these I've actually got them on both my feet right now. So I'm looking at both my feet right now.

Joanna Fleming:
So basically where the blister is or where the sore is. It turns like white underneath the patch. And I think that's, I don't know, healing it or something, but you meant to leave it on for a few days. And then it just like peels off when it's ready. And then you've got like fully healed feet. It's amazing. I didn't know that that's what they did. I just thought that they were there to cushion it, but they actually have like healing technology in them. So honestly, if Compeed want to sponsor me, I'm down. So, hit me up.

Hannah Furst:
This is your Aldi pantyliner moment, Jo.

Joanna Fleming:
Exactly.

Hannah Furst:
Although Aldi, still haven't contacted me. They haven't even seen all my Instagram stories, they don't even look at my stories.

Joanna Fleming:
How many followers do they have? Let's look that up.

Hannah Furst:
How many people tag Aldi? I'd be really interested to know.

Joanna Fleming:
I mean, probably around the special buys, there'd be quite a few tags.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, that's true.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, they've only got 161k. They should be replying to you for sure.

Hannah Furst:
I know, guys.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, all right. I'm going to reach out to them actually.

Hannah Furst:
Just really quickly. I really wanted to talk about like the mask wearing. As you know, I went on a walking date, a guy that lives within five kilometers of me and we met at the park and did a lap around the park and we both had to wear a mask. I've already met him. So I know what he looks like, but how do you know what someone would look like? I guess you'd have to video chat.

Joanna Fleming:
You don't. And honestly, as we discussed the other day off air, we're discovering that there's a lot more hot people in our areas than we thought, because they were all going to the gym before this and now they're actually walking out in public.

Hannah Furst:
It was so awkward. I really don't recommend this walking date with the masks because...

Joanna Fleming:
You guys didn't have anything planned.

Hannah Furst:
Look, we didn't, it's not like we kissed at the end. It was a very awkward end of end of the date.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay, so you didn't shake hands. Did you do the elbow bump?

Hannah Furst:
Nope. He just goes, "okay, see ya" and walked off. And I was like, "oh my God, this is not what I'm used to."

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, I'm cringing.

Hannah Furst:
Like I'm used to you go for a drink and then you're like, "so do you like want to go for another drink?" This is not sexy at all. Like there's no chance of feeling sexy about it.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Well, hopefully we're out of this soon and then we can, you can get back to your normal getting off.

Hannah Furst:
Get back, yep.

Joanna Fleming:
Get back into it. All right, well, see everyone next week.

Hannah Furst:
Bye.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Fleming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast so if you can leave us a review, that would be much appreciated.

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