Episode 45: The Lowdown On Vitamin C

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

Toenail fungus update:

The update none of you asked for - Hannah's finally got on top of her toenail fungus so we're here to share how she did it, and to give a not so subtle plug to unofficial show sponsor, Chemist Warehouse (that's a joke, they do not sponsor us in any capacity).

Hannah used a product called Rejuvenail which is available in pharmacies, and as always, we recommend seeing a GP for advice on medical conditions.

Everything you need to know about Vitamin C:

We asked Brooke Child, Clinical Educator at Advanced Skin Technology, for the complete lowdown on Vitamin C.

What are the benefits? What are the pitfalls? What skin types is it best for? And most importantly, we found out which Vitamin C has Brooke's heart - it's the Société Triple C Vitamin Therapy Serum which you can shop here.

Find all cosmeceutical Vitamin C's here.

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: Garbo & Kelly Brow Gel 

Hannah: Napoleon Perdis Cheek Switch Crème Blush Stick

You can check out the entire Garbo & Kelly collection at Adore Beauty - thank you to Alli Simpson for joining us for a laugh, and if you want to see Megan and Joey_MUA work their magic, you can watch that video below.

Read our disclaimer here.

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst

Guests: Brooke Child & Alli Simpson

Hannah spills the tea on treating toenail fungus. Plus! Brooke Child from Advanced Skin Technology is here chat all things Vitamin C

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 45 Transcript - 'The Lowdown On Vitamin C

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ the podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm your host, Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your cohost Hannah Furst. You've been following my journey on Instagram the last few days Jo, with all the sex scenes in movies, so I'm basically like-

Joanna Fleming:
I responded to your story. And I said, "Are you okay?"

Hannah Furst:
I know that you said are you okay. So because we can't date. And I have basically been watching every sexy movie possible. And last night I realized that I'd basically run out of sexy movies to watch. So I ended up asking my followers to help me. And I've literally seen every single movie they suggested except one that kept coming up. So I've just watched Endings, Beginnings. I've just watched that so good, please watch it if you want to watch two hot people, the sexual tension builds up so much.

Joanna Fleming:
I feel like you basically asked people for porn recommendations.

Hannah Furst:
We'll it's not porn because they don't actually have any sex. So basically, their sexual tension builds up and then it's just, it's so hot. And Sebastian Stan is such a hotty. So there's that one. And then literally, okay, this is what I want to talk about today is Outlander. So someone-

Joanna Fleming:
I have heard about Outlander. Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
I watched six episodes of Outlander and I literally was like, "Okay, I don't know what the hell people are talking about." So I gave up. And so I posted last night when someone said Outlander the whole first season, I was like, I wrote a Instagram and I was like, "I've watched six episodes. Does it get sexier. They haven't even had sex yet." And I got the biggest influx of messages saying, "It's episode seven. That's when it gets sexy." So someone's had in capitals with like a thousand exclamation points the wait is so (beep) worth it.

Hannah Furst:
And then all, "Oh my God stick with it. It's worth it. It only gets better and better. It gets super sexy push on." I reckon I got 20 messages from people. And so I did last night, I watched episode seven.

Joanna Fleming:
And did it come through with the goods?

Hannah Furst:
It did. So I will keep watching. I've got to say, and this is going to be super controversial. He's not really my type I think. He's like very-

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. You do like a bit of a dad bod. Okay. Does he not have a beard or long hair?

Hannah Furst:
He has long hair. Look I'll keep going.

Joanna Fleming:
I usually know your type Hannah and I can pick it from a mile away.

Hannah Furst:
You do.

Joanna Fleming:
What's his name? I'm just going to look it up now Outlander.

Hannah Furst:
Look up guy from Outlander.

Joanna Fleming:
Okay. I'm just looking at it. No, he's not your type at all.

Hannah Furst:
No. No.

Joanna Fleming:
He's probably going towards my type more than yours.

Hannah Furst:
To give you a bit of... I think if you think of Bradley Cooper in A Star Is Born that's my type, but Bradley Cooper in the Hangover is not my type. So I feel like that's a really good representation.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah, actually that's a really good reference.

Hannah Furst:
But actually my type in general is Colin Farrell. If Colin Farrell is listening to this podcast.

Joanna Fleming:
I bet he does. You know what? I reckon he would, for sure.

Hannah Furst:
If anyone knows Colin Farrell who's listening to this podcast, my dream in my whole life ask Linda, literally... I reckon I was eight years old when I fell in love. I was so young when I fell in love with him and I've never fallen out of love with him. And I just feel he was really wild back then, and he's like really grown up.

Joanna Fleming:
Sounds like you guys are together.

Hannah Furst:
It's like a reformed bad boy, which is so my vibe. So my vibe.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. I love that for you. I also had another update by the way, on a past episode. So you know how we did the episode on cold sores?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Fleming:
And we ask people to send in when was the worst time you've ever had a cold sore. And we actually had so many people reply with some pretty intense stories about cold sores. So one girl, I really love this one, she said, "I had my first case at the movies, came out into the light and notice his lips were covered in them." He had the cold sores. Another ones said that as a child, she would get a cold sore every year for school photos. And then another girl said, and I thought this is right up your alley. She said, "Right now, and I have a date tomorrow with that calm in the face emoji." So there was heaps of that replied. There was pages and pages of it. So someone else, they said, "Two days before my wedding, lucky my makeup artists did an amazing job hiding it." Lots of you in the same boat with cold sores.

Hannah Furst:
I haven't had consoles, but I have been dealing with toe fungus, which is what's on [crosstalk 00:04:50].

Joanna Fleming:
Good segment Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
So let's get into it. What is on today's episode before we get onto the toenail fungus.

Joanna Fleming:
We have a clinical educator, Brooke Child on to talk about vitamin C, which has been a highly requested. And of course our products we didn't know we needed. And there's a little surprise guest in the end there.

Hannah Furst:
I'm just trying to find the toe... Yeah. I've got the toenail fungus. Oh my God it's on sale.

Joanna Fleming:
Can you include that Matthew? "Oh my God, it's on sale." You should pick some more up.

Hannah Furst:
I don't think you realize how expensive antifungal nails now Polish is.

Joanna Fleming:
I do. Because I've bought it.

Hannah Furst:
I want to say I'm not a doctor, but I've done some extensive research on toenail fungus. I also went to the doctor and I also got rid of it. So I think I am somewhat qualified, not in a medical sense, but I am qualified in like I've had this and I've helped fix it since. Do you know what toe fungus is? Do you want to tell the people because you probably know better than I do.

Joanna Fleming:
I was relying on you to do this segment.

Hannah Furst:
Okay. So a fungal nail infection is caused by different types of fungi. You know how much I love fungi, mushrooms especially fungi... Yeasts, such as Candida and molds. Basically, the reason that your toes are so susceptible to fungus is because it's like this hotbed for like mold because it's sweaty, you're wearing shoes. You might not dry your feet properly. And I think, look, I've been doing quite a bit of research. I don't think there's enough medical research on Shellac to be definitive about whether that is a contributing factor. But what Shellac does is it stops the nail bed from breathing. It also causes the nail to become more brittle and weak and thinner.

Hannah Furst:
So basically I found this article on CBS News and basically a dermatologist said in general, any manicure left in place for an extended period of time is not a good idea because you are not seeing what he's going underneath the nail polish. So basically that can be related to things like melanoma, but also I think that's really true. You don't want to leave Shellac on your nails for so long that you don't actually know what's going on under the nail.

Joanna Fleming:
Well, remember Chelsea from Trophy Wife as well said remember when we did that episode on SNS and Shellac at the start of isolation as well. And she mentioned that if you do leave it on for too long moisture and stuff can get underneath and then starts to damage the nail. So it's probably the same kind of... Because I leave my Shellac on for two years at a time.

Hannah Furst:
I reckon I had Shellac on for years and years. And so basically what I do is instead of letting my nail breathe for a few months, I would then go back and-

Joanna Fleming:
I just get it done again.

Hannah Furst:
Well, I'd started to get like a little tip of not bad fungus. If you Google toe fungus, it didn't look like that. That's on the end of the spectrum, but this was very mild little bit at the top of the nail. So it wasn't major. So I just kept getting it covered, and covered, and covered. And then obviously lockdown started. We couldn't go to the nail salon anymore. So I had to leave it. And I was like, "This, I don't like this." So I went to the doctor and they didn't do... I don't a hundred percent know if it was fungus. Because technically, they can scrape some of the nail out and get it tested. But the doctor said, she thought it was fungus.

Hannah Furst:
And so there were three options I think. The first option is to keep covering it, which is obviously not ideal, but you could just use normal nail polish to cover it. The second option was to take an antifungal, course of antifungal tablets and that would be 12 weeks, but she had said that that can actually affect your liver. So I think that's really like, that's like the last-

Joanna Fleming:
If you were in a really bad place.

Hannah Furst:
And if you were like, if it was spreading and those sorts of things, you would go to your doctor and discuss about whether or not that's a suitable option. Because I think that you've got to weigh up the pros and cons of that. And the third option was to try one the over the counter antifungal creams or nail polishes from the pharmacy, except that she said it can take six to 12 months to work. Yes, that was my issue. But I got plenty of time. I got plenty of time on my hands.

Joanna Fleming:
Exactly.

Hannah Furst:
So this is what I did after a lot of research. Basically, what you want to do is you want to make sure that the fungus has no way to grow. So what I did was I cut my toenail so far... I cut it as far down as I could go.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh, I hate that feeling. You know when they cut your nails too short.

Hannah Furst:
I didn't cut into the skin, but I caught as much as I could. And I scraped off and I don't know whether this is the right thing to do, but this is what I did. I scraped the top of the nail so it was thinner, so there was less-

Joanna Fleming:
I think it tells you to do that on the instructions. You meant to file down the top of the nail and then put the treatment on.

Hannah Furst:
So that there's like less... And then basically I went to Chemist Warehouse. Another shout out for the amazing Chemist Warehouse.

Joanna Fleming:
They do not sponsor this show by the way. Definitely a competitor.

Hannah Furst:
So I asked the pharmacist what was the best. And obviously she chose the most expensive. It was $50. It's called RejuveNail Anti-Fungal Nail Solution. It's actually $38 on their website right now.

Joanna Fleming:
Because I don't remember spending 50 bucks when I bought it a few years ago.

Hannah Furst:
I spent $50. So if you want to snap up a deal, I'd go to chemistwharehouse.com.au. It's there. And it's called RejuveNail. It's like a nail polish, but it's not nail polish it's just a solution. And you put it on the nail and around the nail. And I did that every night and I kept cutting my nail down and basically in the last few months the nail has started to grow out and it's pretty much gone.

Joanna Fleming:
Oh good for you.

Hannah Furst:
I don't think the fungus has like had anywhere to spread.

Joanna Fleming:
Have you also not really been wearing shoes as well because you've been at home.

Hannah Furst:
Not wearing socks, not wearing shoes, letting them breathe during the day. And that seems to have worked. I think that when we get out of lockdown, I'll probably just go back to a normal manicure and then give my feet a couple weeks break and then get a... But then I love Shellac on my toes-

Joanna Fleming:
Same.

Hannah Furst:
... because it lasts for so long.

Joanna Fleming:
I know. Remember the episode we did with Sarah and I said that I used to use tea tree oil. And she was like, "Oh, that's not really that recommended, like it can work, but like podiatrists don't recommend it." That actually worked for me.

Hannah Furst:
Oh really.

Joanna Fleming:
It got rid of my fungus. But I'm not going to recommend that to anyone because Sarah was like, "Oh, maybe don't do that."

Hannah Furst:
So this is really interesting. I think, you know how like trends come out of things like lockdown. There's like human trends.

Joanna Fleming:
Like TikTok.

Hannah Furst:
I feel like have people discovered they have toe fungus as a result of lockdown because if Jo and I have both experienced this, other people must have experienced this. So let us know. I reckon there's so many people that have discovered there's like funky stuff happening underneath.

Joanna Fleming:
Please don't send us DMs though of your toe fungus without warning.

Hannah Furst:
Jo, you love that. Come on.

Joanna Fleming:
I do. But I know that when I open a DM that's to both of us, that you're going to be like, "Oh my God." I can take it. Hannah, not so much.

Hannah Furst:
So, if you do have, if you've noticed that you've got fungus under your nail. If it's spreading and it's the whole nail and you've noticed that the nail might be coming off, please go to your doctor.

Joanna Fleming:
And also listen to that episode that we did with Sarah because that was one of my favorites, Sarah's a podiatrist. It's a really good episode if you're interested in foot health or you have a foot fetish.

Joanna Fleming:
So today's guest that we have on is going to talk about a topic that I learned a bit more about recently in one of Advanced Skin Technologies, training modules. Brooke is a clinical educator in advanced skin technology. Thanks for coming on Brooke.

Brooke Child:
Oh, thank you so much for having me.

Joanna Fleming:
There's so much research that goes into vitamin C and it's constantly changing. And I think that's something that I learned from you Brooke, in this training module that you were leading. Was that there is a lot of research behind it and it is quite a complex ingredient compared to the other ingredients that we talk quite openly about. So could you start by telling us what actually is vitamin C?

Brooke Child:
Yeah, absolutely. And you're completely right. I think it's one of those vitamins that it's not quite as straightforward because there's so many different types. So it's not just about getting vitamin C and adding it into your routine. It's actually about finding the right one that's right for your skin type, your skin concern. And that's where I think some of the confusion can come into it. So basically, in a bit of a nutshell, your vitamin C is just an amazing antioxidant that has really an endless list of benefits for the skin. However, what's really important to understand first off is that it actually comes in two different forms. So we've got water soluble vitamin Cs, as well as oil soluble, vitamin Cs. So basically the most common water soluble, one that people might've heard of is l-ascorbic acid.

Brooke Child:
So if anyone has ever used the Cosmedix Pure C Crystals, we know that's the ingredient that they use. And one of the things we love about water soluble vitamin Cs is that they're really easily absorbed into the skin. So they've got huge rejuvenating potential, but we do tend to recommend those types of vitamin Cs to that more thicker, resilient pigmented types of skins. Because they can sometimes be a little bit irritating on the skin, if you a bit more prone to that sensitivity and things. Then on the flip side of that, you've got the oil soluble vitamin C. So these penetrate a little bit more slowly into the skin, and therefore it makes them a lot better for your more sensitive rosacea, thinner aging types of skins.

Brooke Child:
But they're still really always incredible because normally they're formulated with things like peptides and other ingredients that really help with skin health and just general wellbeing. So an example of one of those would be your Aspect Extreme C. So you can see that there's a couple of different types, and it really just comes down to the type of skin that you have as to the type of vitamin C that we recommend.

Hannah Furst:
I know with vitamins C, I think someone at our office once said to me, when I first started, I had no idea what the hell it was. I think they said it was like an investment in your face in the future because unlike things like glycolic acid, you're not going to see the results the next day.

Brooke Child:
Yeah, yeah. It's kind of a bit like skin insurance.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, totally. So what are some of the benefits of vitamin C and what kinds of concerns does it treat?

Brooke Child:
Sure. So when I think about vitamin C, I always think about it as the BLT vitamin. So I always think brightening, lightening and tightening. That's how I in a nutshell remember.

Hannah Furst:
I love that.

Brooke Child:
That's how I remember it. Or the other thing I do is I remember my four CS, which is C for collagen, C for calming, C for capillaries, and C for your complexion. So that's how I try and remember what they're for. So to give you a little bit of an idea, obviously, there's a lot of research to support the rejuvenation benefits of vitamin C. So amazing if you're an aging skin or even someone who is looking at preventing the aging process. So we know early intervention is becoming really popular. So we really encourage young people to get on a vitamin C to really help, to prevent that aging process from happening.

Brooke Child:
It can also be a really nice calming ingredient on the skin. So assuming that you pick the right one. If you've got those skins that get a little bit red or do get a little bit sensitive, it can actually have some really beautiful calming benefits into the skin as well. You've also got it for that redness and capillary it's to help with strengthening capillary walls. So if your skin flushes really easily, or you do get that red and tighter skin. And also for pigment and that discoloration in your complexion. So that's where that brightening and lightening comes into it because it really, as you said, Hannah, it won't probably happen overnight. But over time you will start to notice a change in your complexion and that real brightness and radiance to the skin, which I feel like a lot of us could certainly do with.

Joanna Fleming:
Definitely. When we had Tegan Mac on a number of episodes ago, I can't even remember what number episode that was. She suggested that maybe vitamin C isn't the best ingredient for acne prone skin. Are there any skin types or concerns that should avoid vitamin C and why should they avoid it?

Brooke Child:
Yeah, sure. So a couple of things on that one that she's right. Vitamin C it's not necessarily that it's bad for acne. I just feel like there's a lot of other ingredients that we could probably prioritize. So things like niacinamide, vitamin A, salicylic acid, those sorts of ingredients, as opposed to vitamin C. Having that though, what we often find is that the issue that acne skins have around vitamin C is that they've actually picked again the wrong type. So there is one particular form of vitamin C that is actually really great for acne. It's called sodium ascorbyl phosphate. You might've seen it listed as STAY-C 50.

Brooke Child:
So we use it in the Aspect Jungle Brew Serum. And this has actually been shown to have really great benefits of minimizing breakouts without using harsh ingredients. So again, it really just depends on the type, but typically we say, an acne skin isn't great to be on a true vitamin C serum. We would just encourage them to be on something that has that maybe that has got a sodium ascorbyl phosphate ingredient incorporated into it, as opposed to choosing a pure vitamin C serum.

Hannah Furst:
What about for a sensitive skin type? Do you have, so you mentioned Jungle Brew for an acne prone skin type. Do you have any recommendations for a sensitive skin type?

Brooke Child:
Yeah, definitely. So your Aspect Extreme C will probably be the best one for that. It's actually almost what it was formulated for. It does use this oil soluble vitamin C that I mentioned earlier that is really nice and slowly penetrating into the skin. So it just works beautifully to help to strengthen and really still offer all those rejuvenating benefits, but really look at adding strength and just general skin health. And we find that that tends to be very, very well tolerated even by people who have impaired barriers and have used vitamin Cs before and have had reactions. So that would definitely be my hot tip for that one.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Well, speaking of reactions, I've actually had a few DMs recently from people saying that they've not responded the best to a vitamin C. And as you mentioned, perhaps they might be using the wrong one for their skin, but if they just cannot tolerate vitamin C, they've tried a few. Are there any other ingredients that you would recommend having in their routine to tick off those BLT criteria, as you mentioned earlier?

Brooke Child:
You could probably even look at introducing vitamin C potentially like in a complex. So rather than it being the star of the show, using it as an added ingredient in a product. So something like the Aspect Pigment Punch Plus. So that is a pigment product or a pigment inhibitor that we recommend, but it actually has some vitamin C in it, some of that oil soluble vitamin C. So that might be a nice way to introduce it into your routine, still get these benefits of brightening and lightening with obviously those pigment ingredients that are in there. And then once your skin has built up tolerance to that vitamin C, then they could maybe look at introducing something like Extreme C into their routine. But honestly what we find nine times out of 10, if we actually looked at those products that these people are reacting to. A lot of the time, it is that culprit of l-ascorbic acid.

Brooke Child:
Because it is kind of an acid, so it can be quite irritating if it hasn't been prescribed properly. On that just either starting off with something that's just got vitamin C added into it, or again, going on to something a bit more gentle, like your Aspect Extreme C, we find they tend to tolerate it quite well, or even something with like hyaluronic acid in it as well. So we often say, if people are trying to get used to an ingredient that they can even maybe mix it with something, so mixing your vitamin C in with a more gentle ingredient, like hyaluronic acid and it dilutes it or buffers it into the skin for the first few weeks. And then that way as your skin builds up tolerance, you can slowly then start to separate them as you put them on the skin. And that can sometimes be a great way of building up your tolerance to it as well.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. Well, that's a good idea. Because we do the similar thing with retinol. We buffer it with creams and stuff.

Brooke Child:
Exactly right. Yeah. So same thing with vitamin C if need be.

Hannah Furst:
Something that I've like always I'm still a little bit confused about is the word antioxidants. And I know vitamin C is an antioxidant, but I know there's other antioxidants, but I'm not like a hundred percent sure what they actually are and what they actually do. So can you tell us a little bit more about antioxidants and the role that they play in protecting the skin?

Brooke Child:
What happens with an antioxidant we have these things in our body called free radicals. So how I want you to picture a free radical is how I do. So I think of the ball in a pinball machine. So, you know when you flick and the ball goes around everywhere and it ricochets off all the sides, that's what I think of a free radical doing. Everything that it hits in our skin, it causes damage to. So it's like this little menace in the skin that's buzzing around. And what it's actually doing it's actually a very unstable molecule. So it's actually going around looking to complete itself basically and causing a lot of damage in the meantime. And these free radicals get formed by everything. Sun exposure, pollution, us just sitting here, breathing and talking. Lifestyle, diet, basically everything. So we're constantly exposed to them.

Brooke Child:
So what the role of antioxidants are is that they're designed to come in and basically neutralize these free radicals. So they basically say, "Calm down, stop causing so much chaos in the body or in the skin. We've had enough basically." So that's why we require antioxidants in such high concentrations in our skincare because our skin is our protectant. It's that first line of defense against a lot of things like pollution and UV. So we're constantly day in, day out exposed to these free radicals. So how skin does require a constant dose of antioxidants to continue to neutralize these free radicals. Because unfortunately in the skin, we look at free radical damage, meaning pigmentation, sensitivity, collagen and elastin breakdown. You name it. It basically does it. They're like these naughty little gremlins in the skin.

Brooke Child:
So we really want to do everything we can to constantly control these naughty children. And by giving our skin antioxidants topically, we are basically giving the skin best chance at being able to survive these free radicals. So it's probably on the flip side as well why the World Health Organization recommends that we eat so many good fruits and vegetables because we have the same thing that happens in our body. And unfortunately our skin just gets the last part of what we take internally. So we can't always rely on that. So by adding antioxidants into your skin routine, you know that your skin is getting first dibs on all that goodness. And being able to fight those free radicals that are specifically, causing chaos in the skin.

Joanna Fleming:
What are some of the most popular antioxidants that people would find in their skincare products?

Brooke Child:
Oh, wow. There's so many. So things like your vitamin C is a great antioxidant. Vitamin B, resveratrol is a really popular one. Oh gosh, the list is endless. A lot of them have antioxidant properties for different types of concerns in the skin as well. So that will be, when you pick an antioxidant serum, a lot of them will have lots of different types of antioxidants to help with the redness or the pigment that's associated with damage or the aging component. So an idea for that is to really look for a product that has maybe more than one ingredient or more than one antioxidant in it, sorry. That is really tailored to the concern that you have because then that way you know that it'll be really targeting the concerns that those free radicals are causing in your skin.

Joanna Fleming:
And I've always understood that vitamin C is quite a sensitive ingredient and it is hard to stabilize in a formula. And people often wonder why cosmeceutical skincare is so expensive. And I think one of the reasons is because it's very hard to formulate. Can you talk to us a bit about what the biggest pitfalls are with vitamin C?

Brooke Child:
Definitely. So you are right. So stability is a bit of an issue that tends to be more with your water soluble vitamin Cs, but it really comes down to how the product is formulated. So quite often they'll put more advanced delivery systems and things in. And like you said, with the cosmeceutical we know that we are paying a little bit more, but we actually are paying for that technology that does help to stabilize those ingredients. Whereas, obviously with a cheaper product, they might not have that technology. So we know that the product would be a bit unstable or could oxidize really easily. So that's certainly a downfall with vitamin C. The other thing is probably the percentage is quite important.

Brooke Child:
So with your water soluble ones, we need them to be in quite high percentages for them to be active. And for them to be quite stable in the skin, the oil soluble ones can be a little bit less with their percentage. But it does mean that if you do buy a vitamin C serum that claims to be vitamin C, but only has a small amount in it, then the effects may be a little bit negligible. So that can be also a little bit of a downfall when you're choosing your vitamin C.

Hannah Furst:
Is there a specific way that you should be storing your vitamin C?

Brooke Child:
Not really, if the product has been formulated properly, it shouldn't be a problem. You should be able to keep it with all your other products. A lot of the time with the water soluble one, they actually will be in a formula that has no water in it already. So it actually doesn't become active until it hits your skin or until it mixes in with another product that has water in it. So that's usually how they do it, but sometimes a skincare company may recommend that you keep the product away from sunlight and whatnot. But most of the time when you're dealing with cosmeceuticals, they will have that covered within their formula and keeping it nice and stable with their delivery systems rather than you having to keep it in a dark place or in the fridge or anything like that.

Joanna Fleming:
Yeah. And you mentioned also the percentages as well. If the product doesn't actually disclose what the percentage is, how do you know that you're using a really good quality vitamin C?

Brooke Child:
Yeah. That's a good question. Probably, I'd say that if you were to go and have a look at a product, and you were looking at the ingredients list and you see the vitamin C listed a really long way down the ingredients list, that tends to be a bit of a red flag. Also as well if you are looking at a product that maybe one from a cosmeceuticals range and you go, "Okay, this is maybe over a $100." And then you've got another one that's only $25. And you're looking again at that ingredients list. And you notice that there there's a lot of ingredients in there that maybe you can't pronounce, or you feel like you need a chemistry degree to be able to read the list. That tends to be a little bit of a red flag as well.

Brooke Child:
So I always encouraged clients to look at the ingredients list and try and look within the first maybe 10 ingredients or so, and look for something that is key. Even if there's a couple of types of vitamin Cs in there, make sure they're in those top few ingredients. Because then you know they're in a high concentration, but if they're hanging below towards the end of the list. Unfortunately, products can still claim to be a vitamin C serum or a vitamin C product regardless of how much is in it. So that tends to be a clever way of being able to get around, not having the actual percentages disclosed, but being able to see potentially how much might've been actually added into the product.

Hannah Furst:
Do you have a favorite vitamin C that you use?

Brooke Child:
Ooh, it's like asking me who my favorite child is my goodness. But yes, I do. I would have to say the Société Triple C is a staple in my bathroom. I have a love affair with vitamin C, but I also have a really big love affair with peptides. And the Société Triple C has so many peptides coupled in with three different forms of vitamin C in it. So I really, really love that one.

Joanna Fleming:
I got that one to try and now that you've said that I'm like, "I'm going to use that tomorrow."

Brooke Child:
Oh yes. It's my ultimate recommendation for an anti-aging vitamin C and I actually really love the texture of it. And I find being in iso at the moment, being in winter and the heating you find that your skin can get quite dry. I really love the texture of it. It's just got a really nice finish to it. So if you've got a bottle of it, definitely try it. But there's also another one from PCA called the C&E Advanced that I love. This is actually using an l-ascorbic acid, but it's in a cream base and it also uses vitamin E in with it. And then it has some pigment inhibiting ingredients in it.

Brooke Child:
So as someone who suffers from pigment, I'm all about anything that you can give me, that's targeting pigment, I'm all about it. So I tend to go between those two and depending on whether I want a cream or more of a serum, but the two of them tend to be my fan favorites. There is so many benefits to vitamin C. And like I said, it's all just about picking the right one for your skin and not just having a bad experience and then putting it in the corner. There's so many to choose from. It's just a matter of just picking the one that's right for your skin.

Joanna Fleming:
Well, we've actually got a vitamin C category within our cosmeceutical category on site. So that should make it a little bit easier for you guys to shop vitamin C.

Brooke Child:
Absolutely. And your descriptions are so good as well. So it does make it really easy to have a look at those. So yeah, hopefully that will help everyone get motivated to looking into vitamin C and adding it into their routine.

Joanna Fleming:
I'm sure after this chat, everyone will be keen to add a vitamin C into their routine.

Brooke Child:
Everyone needs the BLT, the brightening, lightening, and tightening. Just don't forget about that.

Hannah Furst:
You're making me hungry.

Brooke Child:
I know. Do you know? I think the same thing every time I think about that, I'm like, "Don't think about the sandwich."

Joanna Fleming:
Thanks Brooke. PWUD KWN Hannah, what is your product today?

Hannah Furst:
So basically I have in the last few weeks, I have decided to put makeup on during the day. I just have been feeling really shitty. So I've basically been getting up, putting a foundation on, some bronzer and a bit of blush. And I have discovered this new blush... Well, it's new. So I didn't discover it.

Joanna Fleming:
It was given to you as a sample.

Hannah Furst:
It was given to me as a sample. But it is the best blush that I've ever used.

Joanna Fleming:
I think two other staff have also said the same thing. So now I'm like, why didn't I get one?

Hannah Furst:
It is the best. So, it's the Napoleon Perdis Cheek Switch Creme Blush Stick. And I'm using the color Pink Lady. It's like that very, very pink, pink color, which I love. It's a cream blush, but it then transforms into like a long-wearing matte velvet powder. That makes sense. That doesn't make a lot of sense to me. Do you know what that means?

Joanna Fleming:
Yep. Yep. Makes total sense to me. Yes.

Hannah Furst:
Great. Awesome.

Joanna Fleming:
Do you apply it straight to your cheeks or do you put it on a little brush?

Hannah Furst:
I apply it to my cheek, straight to my cheek, and then I blend it out with like a stippling brush. Is that right? Am I doing the right thing there.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. I'm shocked. Did you just use proper terminology?

Hannah Furst:
Actually, like completely changes the look. I'm obsessed.

Joanna Fleming:
I know how much this blush just transform things. So many people are scared of blush and I'm like, "No, you've got to get on it."

Hannah Furst:
I would highly recommend the Pink Lady. It is such a nice color. It's a very vibrant-

Joanna Fleming:
How many shade are there?

Hannah Furst:
There's three shades it's Go On Rose, Save The Coral, which would be like obviously a more orangy pink. And then there's the Pink Lady, which is the very vibrant pink. And you only need a little bit it's pretty pigmented. So that's mine. What is yours? You have a special surprise for us.

Joanna Fleming:
Yes. So mine I've chosen because I was actually influenced by a ambassador that we spoke to. So we recently chatted to Alli Simpson who is Garbo and Kelly's new ambassador. So I hadn't tried much of the Garbo and Kelly range. I've got one of their eye shadow palettes, which I don't even know if they have it anymore, but I got the clear brow gel. And usually I use a tinted brow gel, but I was using a brow serum on my brows. I feel like feeling pretty thick and pretty full at the moment. So I got the clear brow gel and that is a game changer. She was talking-

Hannah Furst:
What serum are you using by the way?

Joanna Fleming:
I'm using Lashfood on my eyebrows.

Hannah Furst:
Nice.

Joanna Fleming:
They've actually got Browfood, but I'm using the Lashfood because I already had it. And I was like, "I don't want to waste it." So I'm using it in my eyebrows. And that seems to be actually, they're very soft at the moment. But anyway, I'm using this clear brow gel, so another kind of isolation friendly product. But we were chatting to Alli specifically about their brow products and she's obsessed with them as well. But then we got onto the topic and we're going to share this audio with you because it's actually quite funny. So she did a YouTube challenge, which I've seen a little bit on TikTok as well, which is your boyfriend doing your makeup. And she also mentions her brother Cody in there and him doing Miley's makeup as well. So we're getting caught these audio in here for you guys to listen.

Alli Simpson:
My entire makeup bag right now is a brand called Garbo and Kelly. I don't know if you guys are familiar with them. Like they have really awesome stuff. That eyebrow stuff is really great. For me, that's obviously a staple. They're Brows On Point or this Brow Perfection Pencil. I always take that stuff everywhere with me because if I'm not doing a full face, I still have to define brows. A nice lip color, with their lip kits and that stuff.

Joanna Fleming:
We all need a brow on, we can't go browless.

Hannah Furst:
If either of us had boyfriends, Joe and I, we'd definitely rope them into doing our makeup for YouTube. Were you surprised at your boyfriend's level of makeup [crosstalk 00:34:57]?

Alli Simpson:
Oh my gosh. It's so funny because we've been together for almost a year now. And I've always had this idea. I'm like, "I really want you to do my makeup." Because like, obviously guys just have absolutely no idea. I think he's seen it enough times to kind of know a little bit about what's going on.

Hannah Furst:
Was he able to do a cut crease and advanced eye shadows?

Alli Simpson:
The eye shadow was bad.

Joanna Fleming:
I think he nailed the smokey eye. I thought he was quite good.

Alli Simpson:
That's when it went all wrong. The skin was good, glowy and everything, but as soon as the eyes started coming in, that was when I became a bit of a raccoon. But I was very impressed. I was surprised. We initially decided to do it because I don't know if you saw Miley do Cody's makeup.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God, no, I have not seen this.

Alli Simpson:
He put something up on his story a couple of weeks ago. And when they did it, Miley and Cody FaceTimed us, and we'd seen that Cody had this full face of makeup and a full red lip. Because they were just board and they were doing it. And I was like, I'm so doing Mitchell's, so that's why we decided to film ourselves doing it. Because we sort of had to do it.

Hannah Furst:
I love that. I've actually got it up now in that time I've pulled it up and wow, those eyes are popping.

Joanna Fleming:
And if you guys want to see us try this challenge, Meagan from our team actually had her makeup done by her boyfriend Joey. And Hannah we both pissed ourselves at this content.

Hannah Furst:
Honestly, I'm sorry Jo. I know you're on the YouTube channel a lot, but it's my favorite YouTube video.

Joanna Fleming:
It's honestly mine as well.

Hannah Furst:
So funny.

Joanna Fleming:
It's hilarious, we were pissing ourselves at it.

Hannah Furst:
How funny is Joey, when he goes, "Hey guys, follow me at Joey_MUA." I was dead. Like dead. He's a star.

Joanna Fleming:
If you haven't seen it. You've got to go to our YouTube channel.

Hannah Furst:
And then remember I was making a meme. So basically, our team has meme breaks where we just create memes. And I wanted to create a meme to promote that video. And I was like, he really remin... You know the scene in A Star Is Born when she's like, "No Jack..." Jackson or Jack? "No Jackson..." I can't remember. Anyway. She's like, "No, no. And then all of a sudden she storms onto the stage and sings." And I was like that is Joey.

Joanna Fleming:
He's like, "No, no, no. Okay, fine. I'm the star of the show."

Hannah Furst:
So go and check it out.

Joanna Fleming:
And also Alli's video is on her channel as well. But that was my product I didn't know I needed in a very long winded fashion so-

Hannah Furst:
See you next week.

Joanna Fleming:
Bye.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Fleming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about these podcasts, so if you can leave us a review that would be much appreciated.