Episode 36: How To Make The Most Of Curly Hair

We're back for another episode of Beauty IQ Uncensored, brought to you by Adore Beauty. 

What’s on this episode? We’re glad you asked...

Let's talk about texture...

Airbrushed skin isn't realistic, so we chat about all the realisations we've come to in the age of Instagram, and why skin texture is totally normal and acceptable. But hey, if filters are your thing, you do you!

Some of our favourite accounts on Instagram normalising skin texture include:

Katie Jane Hughes

Maddie Edwards

Kadeeja Khan

Listen up, curly girls!

Melbourne-based curl specialist and hairdresser, Neel Loves Curls joins us to chat about all the things curly girls need to know, mistakes we're making with curly hair, how to make the most of your hair texture, and some handy suggestions for Facebook groups to follow for curly hair tips!

You can visit Neel's salon here.

Products we didn't know we needed:

Jo: Murad Vita-C Eyes Dark Circle Corrector 

Hannah: Lonvitalite Dermal Roller Advanced with Interchangeable Head

Watch Hannah's YouTube video here:

Read our disclaimer here.

Hosts: Joanna Fleming & Hannah Furst

Guests: Neel Loves Curls

We chat about normalising skin texture. Plus! Curl specialist and hairdresser, Neel Loves Curls joins us to discuss about all the things curly hair

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 36 Transcript - 'How To Make The Most Of Curly Hair'

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome everybody to Beauty IQ, the podcast.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm your host, Joanna Fleming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your cohost, Hannah Furst.

Joanna Flemming:
Hi, Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
Hi. I think we're going to be doing this remote recording for a little bit while longer.

Joanna Flemming:
I know. Restaurants might open, but we're still doing this. Maybe we could go to a restaurant and do this?

Hannah Furst:
I feel like this is another Hannah episode.

Joanna Flemming:
Actually, now that I think about it, it is.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, so for our cringey convo, we're going to be talking about skin texture. And then we have Neel Loves Curls coming on to talk about all things, curly girls. And of course the products we didn't know we needed.

Joanna Flemming:
On today's episode, we want to start off with actually a message from our founder, Kate, because we recently launched an initiative to raise funds for a organization called Safe Steps. And we were able to raise a massive $50,000 for that organization. And Kate has a message that she'd like to share for the wonderful customers that helped us to achieve that.

Kate Morris:
Hi, Kate Morris here. I just wanted to say a massive thank you to the Adore Beauty community for all of your support. Thanks to you we've been able to raise a total of $50,000 that's going to go to Safe Steps, Victoria, for emergency crisis services and accommodation and support for victims of domestic violence. They need it now more than ever. I'm so, grateful for all of you who went ahead and bought one of those packs. Thank you so much.

Hannah Furst:
All right. So let's get into our cringy combo. We are going to be talking about skin texture and why it's normal.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm seeing more and more filtered photos I think during this time. Because everyone's at home taking selfies.

Hannah Furst:
So the reason I want to talk about skin texture is that we both follow a makeup artist. And if you don't follow her, I really love her account. Her name is Katie Jane Hughes, and she's a makeup artist. And she was the first makeup artist that I started following that was all about skin texture. And I've read a couple of her interviews. And I really liked this one in particular where she said, "Some people do have freak of nature flawless skin," side note, that's Joanna. "Some people do have freak of nature, flawless skin, but most of us don't." That's me.

Hannah Furst:
"I think that it's important to be real with people and put images out there that say, 'Look, I've got pores, I've got fine lines. I'm not going to edit them out. They're part of my face and I don't want to get rid of them. I just want to make my skin look the best it can.'"

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, I love that.

Hannah Furst:
How well does that sum up?

Joanna Flemming:
It sums up our journey.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, totally.

Joanna Flemming:
On the skincare journey. It sums up the journey, I feel.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, because you really want your skin to look the best that it can. But at the same time, you can't get rid of your pores. You actually can't get rid of them.

Joanna Flemming:
They're there because they help the skin to function. So if you didn't have pores... I've still got pores, yes, they are small.

Hannah Furst:
Do you?

Joanna Flemming:
But they're still there. As you know, I'm a fem bot. So...

Hannah Furst:
When I was young, and I've always had, obviously I've got oily skin in my pores. I've always been really big. And I used to go to the movies and you'd see ads with Foundation and... So back then it was in ads. And so you saw, before Instagram, this flawless skin. And so that's what you thought was normal. And then with Instagram, it's like everyone can edit their photos.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, a 100%.

Hannah Furst:
I used to go onto an app, and this isn't even that long ago. But I used to do the airbrush.

Joanna Flemming:
Everyone's been there.

Hannah Furst:
And my sister used to tell me, I think she was like-

Joanna Flemming:
Can you send me an example of one that you've done?

Hannah Furst:
I'll have to find one, but I remember Ruby was like, "I can tell you edited that photo." And I was like, "Oh my God, I got to stop doing this." So I actually stopped doing it altogether. Yeah. I think that when you see all those photos in Instagram, you're like, "Oh, that's how my skin should look" or "that's what's normal." But it's not. It's not at all.

Joanna Flemming:
As you said, it's just changed from those old school ads that we used to see for all of those cosmetic brands, where there was a lot of Photoshopping going on. And now it's just something that we see every day, in something that we use every day, like social media. And it's very hard to escape that. And I think especially for young girls as well, there's an expectation there that their skin has to look a certain way and it's just not the case. That's not what real skin looks like. If you see real skin close up. There is texture. There's unevenness. It's just not realistic to have a completely blurred complexion.

Hannah Furst:
Blurred.

Joanna Flemming:
It's not real.

Hannah Furst:
I think what's happened to me more now is I look at my pores now, and I think it's come with the education that pores are really normal, and that they actually help the skin function. That now I look at my pores and I'm like, "Oh, that's really normal. That's completely fine."

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. I'm seeing a lot more accounts where there's a lot of girls with acne that are maybe going through a Roaccutane journey and they share all of their experience with it for other people, with the same skin condition and they do not filter anything. It is exactly what they're going through, and it's emotional for them, and it's hard to post, and be really vulnerable. But I think that is majorly helpful to people going through the same thing. But remember you said to me ages ago, we discussed how you were comparing your skin to mine. And I was trying to explain to you, "No. You've got oily skin, I've got normal to dry skin." So anyone with normal to dry skin is going to have smaller looking pores to someone with oily skin who tend to have more enlarged pores. So I think it's important not to compare your skin to anybody else's because everybody has their own individual skin concerns and the likelihood is you're not going to have the same skin type. So I think-

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I totally agree with that. But also for me, I think Katie Jane Hughes she sums it up so well, is that you want your skin to look the best it could look, and you want to have that inner glow kind of skin, but you're not trying to make your skin blur out. That's not my goal, is not to completely blur out my skin.

Joanna Flemming:
Your skin looking the best it can, is how it is currently. Your skin from when you started at a door, looks bloody amazing. So I would be really happy with that. That's like-

Hannah Furst:
Thank you!

Joanna Flemming:
A journey that you've come on and it is looking really good, that I would be so happy with that.

Hannah Furst:
I think there was a stage where I was like, "Okay, I've got to try and get rid of these pores." Now I look in the mirror and I'm like, I look at it and I go, "That's normal." If you have oily skin, pores are completely normal. And if you look at Instagram photos that have no pores whatsoever, that's not normal. Poreless skin is not the normal thing.

Joanna Flemming:
Unless you're on my Instagram.

Hannah Furst:
Unless you're on her Instagram and then you're-

Joanna Flemming:
Kidding. I'm totally kidding.

Hannah Furst:
You're totally not. Something else that Katie Jane Hughes has said in an interview is that she said, "Don't get me wrong, everyone edits their stuff. I edit my stuff." So she might edit a pimple, but she doesn't edit the photos into oblivion, which I really like. The thing that I'm taking away from this interview that I read was that, yes she edits her photos, but she will never take pores away ever because you can't get rid of pores. And she says that she thinks it's an unrealistic standard. And I think that the challenge that I've set myself to, after reading this interview, was that I want to really celebrate my skin texture more, and the fact that pores are completely normal, just like cellulite's really normal. And I used to blur all of these imperfections out. And look, I still do. If I'm having a shit skin day, I'm definitely going to use the Paris filter. I'm not going to commit to never using the Paris filter again.

Hannah Furst:
But I think the commitment that I want to make to myself is that I try to be more accepting when I see a photo I don't say, "Oh my God, look at my pores." I'm really like, "Oh, look, that's normal. That's my skin. That's normal skin. And I'm really happy with how it looks." So yeah, I think that if you edit your photos, that's normal and it's nothing to stop doing. It's more about the fact that when you see that photo unedited, that you're like, "Hey, that's really normal and I look great!" Well, we'd love to hear any Instagramers that you followed that, I guess normalize skin texture. We love Katie Jane Hughes, but if you have any others, we would love to see them. So please send us a DM and we'll check them out.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, we'll put a few of our faves in our episode notes as well.

Hannah Furst:
Welcome to our next guest, Neel from Neel Loves Curls in Fitzroy, joins us today. Neel, we actually discovered you through one of our colleagues, [Alexina 00:08:42] from our brands team who goes to your salon, in Fitzroy because she's got very curly hair. And I found it really interesting that you specialize in dealing with clients who have curly hair. Why did you decide to focus on that as a hairdresser?

Neel (Loves Curls):
It was in 2005 and I did an evening course when I arrived in Sydney on curly hair. And it just triggered something in me thinking, "Oh my God, I'd never thought to treat someone with curly hair different." And then I went back to the salon I was working at and then I just became known as the man that does curly hair. In hindsight, I didn't know that much. But then these Americans found me in 2011 or 2012 saying we've got a curly hair group. You should join us. And when I joined them, I was like, "Wow, this is incredible. This is a thing."

Neel (Loves Curls):
I'd already had my salon open. And it was the first salon in Australia to be curly hair only. And I had people telling me, you won't be that busy only doing curly hair, but we booked out months at a time. So there's a massive audience. There's a massive audience for it. And I don't actually have curly hair. That's the irony. I had a blog called Neel Loves Curls and my friends going, "Call it, Lord of the Ringlets." I thought, well, as my bloggers called it, that's what I should call my salon. And then when I did with my blog, I save photographs about two or three months of clients. Then I did my blog.

Neel (Loves Curls):
And then I went from being fully booked every few weeks to being fully booked for, I think it was like five months. And then I got in Frankie magazine and then yeah. I was in a small space just for two people. And now there's five of us. It's just really tricky at the moment with what's happening in the world where we are only having two people in the salon each day. So yeah, the salon's open currently seven days a week. And that's why my voice is a bit raspy, I think, because I'm just so excited to be back at work. I love what I do. So I just feel very blessed that Australia is doing so well with what's happening in the-

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. I think a lot of creatives are just itching to get back to work. I know a lot of makeup artists that are just like hanging to be able to paint faces again. So yeah, I understand your enjoyment to get back to work.

Neel (Loves Curls):
Totally.

Hannah Furst:
A lot of us may not know this, but there's actually a grading system for curls. Can you explain that a little further and what characterizes each curl?

Neel (Loves Curls):
I shouldn't know the name, but I do know there is none and it was Oprah Winfrey's hairdresser in the nineties, and he invented the curl numbering system. So number one is straight hair, number two is wavy hair, number three is curly hair, and number four is coily hair, and it goes ABC. So imagine in the wavys A is a very light wave, and B is a stronger wave, and C is the strongest, tigher wave. On someone's head, there can be a manner of all different textures. And a guest in the salon asked me, they said, "Is it normal that my hair is all different textures?" And I feel very British where I'm like, "Of course it is, love. It just grows out your head. Of course it's normal. It's what it does."

Neel (Loves Curls):
And even yesterday, I did someone's hair. She had stray bits underneath and then wavy at the back and at the front it was quite curly. So just trying to blend the haircut in. It's a lot less. Now, there's a thing called the curly girl method. But I think it was invented 20 years ago by an amazing hairdresser called Lorraine Massey. But I think that calling it the curly girl method when we have lots of men in the salon just sounds a bit weird. So we just call it the curly method. It's like a rabbit burrow. You go down and you're looking at it, there's so much information out there now.

Joanna Flemming:
We did touch on it in a previous episode with another hairdresser and it sounded pretty complex. Is it something that you recommend to clients? Can you explain a little bit more about what that entails?

Neel (Loves Curls):
Cutting it down, making it really simple. There's all different ingredients you technically shouldn't have in curly hair. But I think the main two are silicones and their plastics and they coat your hair. I'm pretty sure that silicones were invented in the late sixties and it makes your hair look shiny. So people want, "Oh my God, it makes my hair look really shiny". But then they realized that it's coating the hair. When your head's got silicone in it, it's like having a barrier. There's water soluble silicones, there's all different versions. But I'm like, "there's so many amazing products out there now it's easy to stay clear of it". And to me that's the main one.

Neel (Loves Curls):
And then you've got sulfates. And then you have sulfates in... There's a lot of shampoos that've got the same ingredients as washing up liquids. And so it's okay when you're going to wash your oily pan and it bubbles up. It's perfect. But on your naturally curly hair, that's dry anyway, you want to leave in all that. You want to hydrate as much as possible. Some people with curly hair shampoo their hair, some don't, it's completely up to that person. I feel if you're putting lots of products in here all the time, it's good to cleanse your scalp as well, but it's also case by case basis.

Hannah Furst:
And are there any luck mistakes that we're making with curls?

Neel (Loves Curls):
I would say that in Australia, in light of the... You can hear my English tone, and there's no training on it. I've been hairdressing like 21 years. And for the first five years of hairdressing, I was cutting someone's hair wet. That's just not very professional. So it's really hard to say when someone's been hairdressing a long time and they're like, "Oh, this is what we do. That's what I was trained with." But like everything in life, things can change, things evolve and there's so much information out there. There's a website called naturallycurly.com and it's got so much information for a newbie wanting to look and learn about their hair. You're kind of inundated. There's millions of Facebook groups on it as well. It's just being open to it. I think that's going against the fundamental rules of hairdressing and cutting hair curl by curl instead of pulling intersections is for some people very confronting.

Hannah Furst:
Well I must say when Alexina came in from her first haircut at your salon, I was blown away by how good her hair looked. Even the way it was styled, it's like she had learned to style it the way that you guys do it in the salon as well. And so all her curls just looked so defined and it looked amazing. And also just the way that it was cut, looked fantastic as well. So obviously there is a bit of method to that madness. So the way that you cut it, did the people that come and see you pretty much always wear their hair curly? I kind of imagined that they'd be straightened.

Neel (Loves Curls):
Well, it really depends. We say the haircuts are made for curly hair. They cut dry, and we're cutting each individual curl. So if you've got a tight curl and a loose curl together, if you pull them down, the tight curl will be longer than the looser curl. So if you straighten it, it won't work that way. So imagine you've got someone with straight hair comes in and then you curl the hair then cut it. What would that look like? Does that make sense?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, that's actually a really good analogy.

Neel (Loves Curls):
Yeah it's really fun. I really truly love what I do. I get to make someone feel happy, because I've never had curly hair. I've never known the experience of going into a hair salon with that fear of what they're going to do to my hair. Because you don't ever thin it out or raise the hair. The way I tell people, that if you're going to take weight out of a tree, you get a tree surgeon that knows what they're doing. But if someone gets a razor, it's like ripping the bark off the tree and that's not how you kind of thin a tree. You get a tree surgeon and you take certain branches out to make it work. And then probably the same way as well, when you get thinning scissors, I would say it's like getting a rake and ripping the leaves out of the tree and being, "Look, I've taken all the leaves out", but you've got to strategically the way you're cutting it what curls you take. Does that make sense?

Neel (Loves Curls):
So I tell every client, I look for three things in a curly haircut. Shape, elevation and hydration. Shape because even though every now and then we do a triangle haircut that some younger women it's very fresh prince of Bel-Air. It's pretty cool, having that shape. But I've got other women in their 40s, that's their curly hair trauma of growing up, not wanting to try and heal. And then we have elevation a lot of, I'd say half our guests have very flat hair at the roots. So they want to learn how to get more volume at the roots and then hydration. Curly hair always needs a lot more hydration. Wavy, not quite as much, but if your hair's colored or if it's in the curly, coily range, it needs so much hydration it.

Joanna Flemming:
Why is that? Why does very curly hair need more hydration than my hair type which is very straight and fine?

Neel (Loves Curls):
It's because curly hair is a coarser texture. And it means, imagine if you've got a pine cone and it's dry and the pine cone's all splayed out, and then if you get a pine cone and then you put it into a glass of water, it all kind of closes and goes really smooth. When you touch curly hair and I run my finger down it, I can always tell if someone's got heavy butter or oil in their hair because that doesn't hydrate it. When you're thirsty, you drink a glass of water. You don't drink a cup of oil. I'm not saying I don't use oil. When I've got someone's hair, that's bleached, damaged or very dry. And I'm only doing a tiny trim at the very bottom. And I've got to try and make it feel a bit smoother, I use probably like a 5 cent piece on very thick hair. Hardly any.

Neel (Loves Curls):
When women age, your curls don't changed from a little girl, to a teenager, to in your twenties when you start going nuts and coloring it, and then in your thirties, I'm generalizing here, but if you have a baby, your curls can change. Hormones can change your curls radically. You can have tight curly hair and have a baby and suddenly half your hair goes a lot looser. And then your next baby, it can go a lot tighter again. And then you get another one then you could lose a lot of your curls. It's a constant thing. And people say, "Yeah, I think I've lost my curls." And I get people think it's a quick fix. "Let's just straighten it. I can't deal with it". But when the roots come through, it's quite hard.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
Hannah do you feel attacked?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
Hannah has very curly... Oh, I wouldn't say you have very curly hair Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
It used to be very curly.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. So she's done the chemical straightening.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. I've done everything. So it's feels too late for me now. I was going to ask you, is there a curly girl method wash because I had a read through it and I was like, "I just don't think I can do this." And especially the not washing of the hair. I felt my head would get really itchy.

Neel (Loves Curls):
That depends, it's case by case basis. It says don't wash your hair, but I think that you need to every now and then, when your hair needs it. If you've been to a festival wash your hair. If you've been putting a lot of products in it, and wash your hair.

Hannah Furst:
I was thinking, I knew we had this interview today and I was washing my hair and I was like, "What if I just washed the... I used a scrub on the scalp." Because for me, I could not wash the ends. That's fine. But the scalp, I've got to get in and wash my scalp.

Neel (Loves Curls):
I would say more than about 80% of my guests wash their hair about once a week. Some people with afros don't wash it. But a lot of people with curly hair have gotten into hair salons and been shamed. So when they say I don't wash my hair, they're like, "Oh, that's horrible". But their hair looks amazing. And if it doesn't need it, then don't do it. But on wavy hair, it can get really weighed down with products and adding conditioner. So it's a little bit. As long as your product is sulfate, silicone free, then I'm totally fine with it. There's lots of rules to it, but you've got to workout what works for you. Right? Because at my salon, we don't color hair. Number one is it's not my passion. Number two, when someone's got really healthy stunning curls, and they just want to... They get bored and they want to do crazy stuff to it.

Neel (Loves Curls):
The part of me going, "Oh my goodness. That'll be a shame." But the other thing is, when you've got thick curly hair and then you color it, you could be at the base and for hours de-tangling that. And then as a business thing as well, if someone doesn't turn up and that's a three hour appointment gone. So that's why we don't color hair in my salon. But there's lots of rules. There's a Facebook group called Curly Girls Australia it's got I think, 50,000 women in it. But there's another group [crosstalk 00:22:21] Yeah, there's another group which I think you may like, which is the Curly Girl group, but with no rules. You notice if you do right, "Hey, I am going to blow dry it." You won't get vilified for... On the other group, they won't be impressed you saying it.

Joanna Flemming:
Now that I'm hearing all of this, I'm like, "Oh, maybe I don't want curly hair." Because it sounds a lot harder to manage than mine.

Hannah Furst:
If anyone wants to see Neil, you can head to Neil Loves Curls on Instagram. He's based in Fitzroy, in Melbourne. And of course he deals with curly hair. So if you've got curly hair, that might be the place to be. Thanks for joining us, Neil.

Joanna Flemming:
All right, pay every day, K-W-N. Hannah, you start us off.

Hannah Furst:
My product. This week is the long vitality, derma roller advanced with interchangeable head. It's a long name. So as you know, I love skin needling. So what I actually wanted to call out in this episode was if you are really confused by skin needling, both at-home skin needling and in-clinic skin needling, head to our YouTube channel. And I have done a video. I think it's called...

Joanna Flemming:
It's a new, you'll see Hannah there, it's hard to miss...

Hannah Furst:
You'll see me there... It's hard to miss... and basically in this video I was using the new dermal out with the interchangeable head.

Joanna Flemming:
That's the one with the multiple heads. Isn't it?

Hannah Furst:
No. It's a new one. So you can basically repurchase just the interchangeable head. So you know how you've got to replace your derma roll every few months?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
So this one you just buy the new head, and then you can just put that on and throw out the old one. And they've also got an ice rollout replaceable head as well.

Joanna Flemming:
That's up my alley. So could you leave that in the freezer?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. "Just keep it in the fridge," it says. If you need to cool it quickly, place it in the freezer, but don't store it there.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So I don't really have much else to say about it because you can go and watch that YouTube video, and I basically I'd be here all day if I was trying to tell you how to do a derma roll properly. Go check it out on YouTube if you're interested in seeing that derma roller in action. And that's all I have to say on the matter.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay.

Hannah Furst:
And what about you Jo?

Joanna Flemming:
So my product I didn't know I needed, I think I alluded to last week and it is the Murad Vita-C Eyes Dark Circle Corrector. So as I said on Instagram, I think I did a Sunday session two weeks ago. And I said on that generally I don't like to recommend things purely for dark circles because I feel like there is a big influence from lifestyle and hereditary factors when it comes to dark circles. And so I don't like to usually recommend stuff specifically for that, because I just don't think that it's ever going to live up to the expectations that you have. So I tried this Murad Vita-C Eyes Dark Circle Corrector, not expecting it to do a whole lot. I thought, "Oh, It'll give me a bit of hydration. I'm sure it'll be a nice eye cream", but I wasn't expecting it to actually do anything to my dark circles. And legit a week later, I was like, "Holy shit, this is actually doing something". I've got a really dark circle under one eye.

Joanna Flemming:
And then the other eye's kind of normal. I don't know why one eye is worse than the other. If anyone can tell me that, that would be great. But this eye serum has a vitamin C complex. I think it's got three forms of vitamin C. It's got red and brown algae extract. And that helps de-puff and soothe and brighten. And then it's got these light reflecting minerals and they give a brightening appearance to the eye straight away. So as soon as you put it on, it brightens the under eye. So I've been using it under makeup as well in the morning and using it at night too. So I'm probably going to run out of it soon because I'm using a lot of it, but it definitely made a difference for me personally and my darker circle. So I'm just going to keep smashing it. I love it.

Hannah Furst:
I'm loving that range as well. The Vita-C.

Joanna Flemming:
Have you used the serum?

Hannah Furst:
I'm using the serum. It's quite tingly.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. It tingled for me the first couple of times. And then I think I've adjusted to it.

Hannah Furst:
It is quite colic and vitamin C. So I would be surprised if it didn't tingle. It feels like it's doing something, that's for sure.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Have you noticed it makes you look glowy the next day?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Well, I'm actually using that one, trying that one on my chest as well. I have done a phenomenal job of fading the pigmentation on my chest.

Joanna Flemming:
Have you got a before and after?

Hannah Furst:
Okay. So I have photos from Thailand and that's when my chest started...

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, I remember you saying you'd put on SPF and it was still tanning.

Hannah Furst:
I could really see the pigmentation and the freckles coming to the surface on that trip and it was like "Oh no. And so I've started using vitamin C and it's really faded, particularly that one spot and we'll have to do an episode on it and I'm really impressed with myself.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, let's do that. We'll find out how you did it. I think I know some of the products you've been using, but I don't know all of them.

Hannah Furst:
Well, I've been using a whole heap. Literally, I lay out everything on my chest. I don't care. I've actually got some new memes to share with you, Jo, to finish this off.

Joanna Flemming:
I love sometimes people send us memes on Instagram, they're meme for the podcast. And it's really cute. I love that.

Hannah Furst:
I have been getting so much mac and cheese content sent to me and people keep... Oh my God. I get a new recipe sent to me every day people are like-

Joanna Flemming:
Really?

Hannah Furst:
Yes! And someone sent me a message and said, you're a mac and cheese influencer, laughing obviously, but seriously the mac and cheese is like, I'm loving it. It's so good.

Joanna Flemming:
Are you sending me one now?

Hannah Furst:
No, I'm not. I don't have anything to send you right now. But I have some to read out to you that I think this one in particular, so actually shamelessly re-posted these. So "I miss leaving an event that I never wanted to go to an Ubering home no matter the cost". That's you.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh my God! That is so me. I would pay for an Uber to get home. If I want to leave, I don't care how much it costs.

Hannah Furst:
Okay. Here's another one, "I just don't see bras making a come back after this."

Joanna Flemming:
I'm definitely wearing a Calvin Klein crop top for the rest of my life. I'm never putting a bra on again.

Hannah Furst:
Why would you? Honestly.

Joanna Flemming:
I know.

Hannah Furst:
Okay, now this one's for me and for anyone else in their early thirties. "At 33, I'm like an old phone battery. Even when you charge me overnight for 10 hours by 10:00 AM, I'm at 60%." That is so me. Did I read this one before? Okay. "1920 alcohol is prohibited. 2020 liquor stores are an essential business during a national health crisis". That's us for another week.

Joanna Flemming:
Another week.

Hannah Furst:
Love your pores.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Love your pores. Love your skin texture.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Flemming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast so you can leave us a review. That would be much appreciated.