From $20 to $145, Get a Whiff of Our Yummiest Festive Candles and Home Scent Gift Sets

christmas candle gift setschristmas candle gift sets

As the wise Oprah once said, "You get a candle, you get a candle, everyone gets a candle."

Oh wait... OK, so she didn't say it exactly like that.

But whether it's for your mother-in-law or colleague, a friend or even yourself, home scents and candle gift ideas are guaranteed crowd-pleasers.

Side note - we find out the difference between good candles (and bad ones) in this episode of the Beauty IQ Uncensored podcast below!

In other words, the answer to 'is a candle a good Christmas gift?' will always be yes.

No matter your budget, we've rounded up the yummiest, most festive Christmas home scent and candle gifts and gift sets.

1. Cire Trudon Limited Edition Gold Amber Abd El Kader Candle, $145.

Cire Trudon Limited Edition Gold Amber Abd El Kader CandleCire Trudon Limited Edition Gold Amber Abd El Kader Candle

Just for fun, we thought we'd start with the most luxurious, decadent candle and work our way down.

So, may we introduce you to Cire Trudon Limited Edition Gold Amber Abd El Kader Candle 270gm

It's the Rolls-Royce of Christmas candle gifts. Literally, Frenchman Maison de Cire Trudon was crafting candles for King Louis XIV and the royal court of Versailles back in 1643.

This 270g candle is available for a limited time only (seriously, once it's gone, it's gone), and is an ultra-luxe amber and gold glass version of the brand's best-selling spiced tea and fresh tobacco candle.

It's almost too pretty to light - Cire Trudon candles are strong enough you can smell them without ever lighting them - but when you do, you'll get a whiff of fresh mint, black tea with ginger, clove, smooth blackcurrant, apple, jasmine and vanilla. You can also reuse the gold glass jar as a candle holder to make cheaper candles look luxe, or to store your makeup brushes in.

Oh, and you should know, it also comes in the larger Cire Trudon Limited Edition Gold Amber Abd El Kader Candle Intermezzo 800gm size for a casual $449.

2. Glasshouse Tahaa Carousel, $79.95.

Glasshouse Tahaa Carousel Glasshouse Tahaa Carousel

Glasshouse are known for their Christmas candles, and even more so, the best-selling sweet caramel and vanilla Tahaa scent.

But honestly, Glasshouse Fragrances Carousel Giftset Tahaa -380g is one of the most beautiful candles we've ever seen.

This candle will always be lovely to look at, but once you light her up, the way the gold spinning carousel throws warm golden light around the room is magical.

Light at night in a dimly-lit room to take in the full mesmerising effect, best enjoyed with a bowl of Christmas pudding, extra cream.

3. Carrière Frères Pin de Siberie + Cedre du Henan Candle, $75.

Carrière Frères PIN DE SIBERIE + CEDRE DU HENAN CANDLECarrière Frères PIN DE SIBERIE + CEDRE DU HENAN CANDLE

Got a loved one who isn't into over-the-top Christmas decorations? Give them this subtly festive scent.

You wouldn't know Carrière Frères PIN DE SIBERIE + CEDRE DU HENAN CANDLE 185GM is Christmassy at all just from looking at the limited edition white and gold container, but light it up and be instantly transported to a cosy armchair in front of a wood fire in a cabin deep in the woods.

The fragrance brings together Siberian Fir and Chinese Henan Cedar for a woody, lightly smokey scent that smells like being outside on a crisp day in a snowy, pine tree forest.

It also reminds us of how a real, fresh Christmas tree smells - perfect for making apartment living with a plastic tree feel more festive.

4. Maison Balzac And Now Relax Incense Set.

 Maison Balzac And Now Relax Incense Set Maison Balzac And Now Relax Incense Set

A Maison Balzac incense set the epitome of minimalist style.

Each limited edition incense set comes with a glass pebble incense holder and a box of premium quality incense. Plus, you can choose from three equally chic shades and scents:

5. Circa Home 60g Lychee & Rose Mini Candle Bauble.

Circa Home Lychee & Rose Mini Candle BaubleCirca Home Lychee & Rose Mini Candle Bauble

Finally, if you want to make a little go a long way, you can't go wrong with an adorable mini candle that also doubles as a Christmas decoration.

Circa Home Lychee & Rose Mini Soy Candle Bauble is one of our favourites.

Inside this chic bauble packaging, you'll find a mini lychee and rose candle with other yummy notes like grape and strawberry.

Got an eco-conscious loved one? Everything about this Aussie-made, natural soy candle is recyclable, including the glass jar and the packaging. How good?!

Here's Every Product Mentioned in This Article:
Add To Bag

P.S. You can also find Kris Kringle and Secret Santa inspo in our holiday gifting YouTube video below!

Want more Christmas gift guides? Check out these stories below!


Want to learn more? Here's the transcript of our Beauty IQ Uncensored podcast episode on skin tags and candles.

    

    

Amy joins us once again, this time to chat skin tags. We also chat to Glasshouse Fragrances founder, Nicole Eckels.

Beauty IQ Uncensored Episode 61 Transcript - 'How To Know A Good Candle When You Smell One'

    

 

Hannah Furst:
Welcome, everybody, to Beauty IQ, the podcast.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm your host, Joanna Flemming.

Hannah Furst:
And I am your cohost, Hannah Furst.

Hannah Furst:
Something really strange happened yesterday, and I wanted to ask you what the F happened.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
So I was using my curling wand on my hair, and all of a sudden, a big clump of it burnt off. And then I was in the shower-

Joanna Flemming:
Where? Show me.

Hannah Furst:
I can't really see where it's happened, because I think it's actually fallen out at the root, because basically, I'm looking in the mirror and all of a sudden this whole clump of hair burns off. And then it was attached to the curling wand. And I thought maybe there was product in my hair. There's two things that happened: Either there was products on that part of the hair that I didn't know was on there, and then it was wet and it burnt off, or ...

Joanna Flemming:
So your hair was dry?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. My hair was dry.

Joanna Flemming:
What temp did you have the iron on?

Hannah Furst:
230, but I always have it on 230.

Joanna Flemming:
Okay, that could be ...

Hannah Furst:
No, there's another option.

Joanna Flemming:
You also have just coloured your hair as well.

Hannah Furst:
Yes, that, but I actually think I was in a daydream and didn't realise.

Joanna Flemming:
That you had it on for so long?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, I think I-

Joanna Flemming:
How long do you usually leave it in?

Hannah Furst:
Usually it's five seconds and it buzzes and it vibrates, but I think I forgot.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, that's the Curlbar?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So I forgot to press the little button, and I think I then went into a daydream thinking about some guy or something; I don't know what I was thinking about, but I must've gone into a daydream and not realised, and it was like 20 seconds.

Hannah Furst:
And so then what happened was this morning, I was in the shower washing my hair, and I start brushing through my masque, and I swear to God, the biggest clumps of hair start falling out from where the hair has been ... What a nightmare. Honestly.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, so it just could have been that you recently coloured your hair and maybe there was some damaged bits, and it's just too hot for those bits of your hair.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Well, maybe it was the part that was bleached. I'm pretty devastated, I'll be totally honest with you. I just was like-

Joanna Flemming:
Was it a really big strand?

Hannah Furst:
A huge chunk of hair is gone.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh my God. Well, you've got the thickest hair ever. If it was my hair I'd have a bald patch.

Hannah Furst:
The amount of hair that came out in the shower today plus the amount of hair that was burnt off yesterday, I reckon it was a little ponytail's worth.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, wow.

Hannah Furst:
It was a lot of hair. I was almost going to go to the doctor, and, "Is there something wrong with me?"

Joanna Flemming:
I really think it has something to do with the temp of the iron and the fact that you just coloured your hair.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Oh my God, guys, don't do that.

Joanna Flemming:
If it keeps happening, though, definitely go and see a doctor.

Hannah Furst:
I definitely won't go up to 230 again.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. Let's avoid that for future times.

Hannah Furst:
I just want to say that I've just looked at the notes for this episode, you've chosen these [crosstalk 00:03:16]-

Joanna Flemming:
Selling your product you knew you needed.

Hannah Furst:
That was the product I didn't know I needed.

Joanna Flemming:
You can't do the same one as me.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my God. I literally used it last night, and then it was like, yes, I've got my product.

Joanna Flemming:
What is on today's episode, Hannah?

Hannah Furst:
On today's episode, we have got Amy back to talk about skin tags, and then we asked speaking to Nicole Eckels, who is the founder of Glasshouse Fragrances and then the products we didn't know we needed. And I will have to quickly find one.

Joanna Flemming:
So, Amy is joining us again today. Hello.

Amy Eckles:
Hello. How is everybody?

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, we're good. We're good. Aren't we, Hannah?

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, we're pretty good. [crosstalk 00:04:04].

Joanna Flemming:
Today you have come on to chat to us about skin tags, and Hannah and I have actually had our own experiences with skin tags.

Hannah Furst:
Oh my goodness.

Joanna Flemming:
Which we can also share, but I would love to hear your take on skin tags, because we've actually had a dermatologist come on to talk about the skin tags that happen during pregnancy, but they actually go away once you've had the baby. So, tell us, what has your experience been?

Hannah Furst:
First of all, can I just confirm that neither of you have tried to cut off your own skin tags?

Joanna Flemming:
No. I have not. Judging by some of the DMs I've gotten recently, I wouldn't be surprised if some of our listeners have tried to cut off their own skin tags. Judging by the waxing DMs I got, I would not be surprised.

Hannah Furst:
I'm surprised I haven't.

Joanna Flemming:
Same.

Amy Eckles:
Yeah. Well, when you said that you have a skin tag story, I was like, "Please tell me that you haven't tried to cut them off." So I think the fact that you might've received some DMs potentially with people, and skin tags, very problematic. It's good to come on and chat about them.

Amy Eckles:
Skin tags for anyone that doesn't know, they're those squidgy little tags, I guess, that you get-

Joanna Flemming:
They're hard not to touch. Once you have one there, you just want to fondle it.

Amy Eckles:
Yeah. I've got a bunch of skin tags, and part of it's genetic, and some people just get lots of skin tags, and that's just your lot in life. This ties in perfectly with a lot of the topics that we've been discussing lately like chafe, sweat, all these things, because I have a lot around areas where I sweat, so like under my arms, I've got some really fun ones under each arm where the bra strap line is. Oh, yeah. I can't stop touching it. It's rank.

Amy Eckles:
The reason why I want to talk about them is because there's a lot of misconceptions around how to "get rid of them." And one of them is that some people do either tie some string around them at home themselves to try and make them fall off, or they try and cut them off. And both, please do not do that.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Yeah. Do not do that.

Amy Eckles:
What's your skin tag experience?

Joanna Flemming:
Well, I wanted to say that a lot of the times skin tags come from friction. So it could be from either something else rubbing on the area, like a bra strap. It could be from your own skin rubbing on an area, or it could be from jewellery. So that was my experience. I always wear necklaces. And years ago, I wore the same necklace every day, never took it off, but I have a habit of, when I've got a necklace on, I swing it around my neck as a habit. And so I created this skin tag on my neck, and I was actually working in clinic at the time. So I just went in and saw one of the doctors there. And I had so many things done. I've had an injection in my bum for tonsillitis and it went away [inaudible 00:07:16] honestly a dream working with doctors sometimes.

Joanna Flemming:
So I had this skin tag on my neck, and I was like, "What do we do about it?" And they told me that it was actually probably from the necklace because it was right in that area where it would usually rub. They chopped it off with scissors. Basically they put a bit of local anaesthetic in there, so I didn't feel it, because it does have blood vessels and stuff in there. So they can bleed quite a lot as well, but he just snipped it off and then put a bandaid over it. And I was all good. I can still feel where it was, but you can also have them burnt off too, which I'm sure you'll probably going to go into that.

Joanna Flemming:
Have you tried to have yours removed?

Amy Eckles:
To be honest, I've never cared enough to warrant the effort that it would take to go to the doctor and have it burnt off.

Joanna Flemming:
I just couldn't stop touching that one, so I was like, "I need to get rid of it."

Amy Eckles:
Yeah. Well, it's in a highly touchable area. The one on my back, it's like, eh, I don't see it. I just feel it sometimes. And I'm kind of fond of the ones under my arm near my bra straps. Whenever I shave my armpits or put on deodorant, I'm like, "Oh, hello." But no, I haven't had any of them removed, but I can definitely speak to how to have them removed safely. But Hannah, do you have any skin tags? Just a personal question.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Well, I was a little bit confused, I think, because I had this thing on my neck, and I playing with it and kept touching it, and Jo's like, "What's that?" And I was like, "It's a skin tag." She was that doesn't look a skin tag. That looks a mole that's gone a bit crusty." And I was like, "What?"

Joanna Flemming:
I accidentally freaked her out. I was like, "I think that could possibly be BCC."

Hannah Furst:
I literally cold up the mole checking place that day, left work early to get it checked. It didn't look suspicious, but he's like, "Do you want to get it a biopsy?" So I was like, "Yes." So I got a biopsy and it was fine, but it was a mole. It wasn't a [crosstalk 00:09:13].

Amy Eckles:
Just your garden variety mole.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
See, I'm the kind of friend that you want looking out for you, because I'll tell you if a mole looks suspicious. If I see something on your back, I'm like, "You need to go and get a skin check."

Amy Eckles:
Yeah, it's funny, because you get confused with the different spots and bits on your body, because is it a mole? Is it a skin tag? Is it potentially a skin cancer? Very different varying degrees of seriousness. It's important to note that if your skin tags are rubbing on things in a high contact area, say, where it's exposed to rubbing against other things, which might cause them to bleed or to be sore, then you might want to go and see someone about them. But actually they're completely harmless. There's actually nothing wrong with having skin tags apart from the way they look, if they bother you.

Amy Eckles:
So other than that, you don't need to stress about skin tags. But if you ask someone that, genetically, some people just have a lot of them, and they can look, they can have slightly different colours. Usually they can range from your skin tone colour, a bit pink, summer, a bit darker. You can go to the GP or your dermatologist and they can get rid of them pretty quickly by either freezing them with liquid nitrogen, like sometimes you get sunspots frozen off with a can of liquid nitrogen. You can have them safely cut off in a doctor's office with sterilised equipment, a really sharp scalpel, please do not try and cut them off at home with your kitchen scissors.

Joanna Flemming:
We literally had people messaging us after that wart episode where people were like, "Oh, yeah, my brother tried to cut his own wart off," or, "he chewed his own wart off." And I was like, "Oh, my God. I did not expect that after the episode."

Amy Eckles:
Maybe we can all agree, just a blanket rule not to cut bits of your body off.

Hannah Furst:
Or you've just broken up with someone and it's your fringe. Then I totally support your decision to cut your own fringe.

Joanna Flemming:
Hair, totally fine.

Amy Eckles:
And I guess the third way, which probably isn't as common any more but it makes sense why the wives' tale of tying something to it to make them fall off. When you go and see a doctor, they can tie it with a surgical thread to stop the blood flow, because, Jo, as you mentioned, it's made up of collagen and blood vessels, skin tags. And so if you cut off its blood supply, theoretically it should just die and fall off. So then there's this wives' tale that, yeah, you can just tie it up at home with ...

Amy Eckles:
So I've heard someone tying it with a strand of hair or fishing wire. Please don't do that.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. And also, if you snip them off yourself, just with scissors, it will bleed a lot.

Amy Eckles:
And it might heal with a nastier looking scab or scar than if you just had left the skin tag alone. There's nothing wrong with them. If you have them, they're completely normal. But if they bother you, you can do something about it. It's your body. You have options, but nothing to be ashamed of, the skin tag.

Joanna Flemming:
All righty. So we have had some requests from listeners for an episode discussing candles. So we thought who better to chat candles with then the founder of Glasshouse Fragrances, Nicole Eckels. Welcome to the show.

Nicole Eckels:
Hello. Hello. So nice to be here, Joanna.

Joanna Flemming:
It's such a pleasure to have you because I'm such a big Glasshouse fan. So this is a bit of almost a fangirl moment for me. Hannah knows how much I love Glasshouse.

Hannah Furst:
Oh, she sure does.

Nicole Eckels:
Hi, Hannah.

Hannah Furst:
Hey.

Joanna Flemming:
So, you started Glasshouse after moving to Australia in 2005. And I'd say it's since become the most well-known candle brand that we have here. How did that even happen? How did Glasshouse come about?

Nicole Eckels:
I am well and truly a beauty junkie from 16 years old. And when I moved to Australia for work for a role outside of cosmetics, I was used to being from arguably one of the biggest beauty markets in the world, which is New York City. And then I moved from there to beautiful Australia, which I love for many reasons, but one of them that was not as advantageous is the fact that there was hardly any brands or product. That's changed a lot. At the time, none of you guys were around.

Nicole Eckels:
So, what happened was I was pretty much stuck with whatever I could get my hands on and also very expensive bags coming back and forth from the US. Every time I travelled there, I'd just fill suitcases with product. And I realised that there's a real opportunity in the Australian market to create at least some candles first, and then we'll see what happens after that. My real intention was to have an incredible bath and body brand, because it wasn't just candles that were missing; I felt all of it was missing.

Nicole Eckels:
But the first product I tackled, probably out of need, I just needed more and I couldn't get my hands on any, was scented candles. So I created that first.

Hannah Furst:
And I guess since then Glasshouse has really exploded. Why do you think Glasshouse exploded in the way that it did? Do you think other candles at the time were a bit average?

Nicole Eckels:
Well, at the time, I mean, there weren't really any candles, Hannah. There were other brands. Dusk was around back then, but Dusk wasn't doing scented candles. They weren't specialising in fragrance. They were doing decorator. So if you wanted a taper or a pillar, or if you wanted something to put on your coffee table, you could have a great old time. There was plenty of that. But there weren't any brands that were specialising or focused on fragrance delivery, which is what a candle can do. So there were candles here, but they just didn't work in that sense.

Nicole Eckels:
So, I came into a market where the consumer mindset was candles don't work. You can't smell them. What's the point? They would pick up something that would say Vanilla, and they would burn it, and there was no scent.

Nicole Eckels:
So when I launched Glasshouse, I was so blessed because there was this gigantic gap, no one was really doing candles properly. What ended up happening was I realised that I was creating this gap or filling this gap, rather, and suddenly, everyone was engaging with scented candles because we were putting these into stores and we were lighting them and people realised, "Oh, wow, candles do smell. They can actually smell."

Nicole Eckels:
And the thing is, is my benchmark was not, oh, it just needs to smell. I'm a beauty junkie. I came from a background where I used everything. So not only was I trying to make a candle, I was trying to make the world's best candle, from a US perspective, that was already a cluttered market with great products. And I think that is why we've done so well. And that's why we continue to, because our products are world-class, because the bar's so high.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. Well, speaking of the scents and how strong the scents are, what's the deal with the triple scented thing? Is that why Glasshouse smells so strongly?

Nicole Eckels:
Triple scented is about the amount of fragrance load that you put in there. It's something we created to try to get the point across that every candle we make, no matter what type of fragrance it is, we'll deliver a robust amount of fragrance that you can perceive that you will love. And within our range, there's differences depending on the fragrance itself or the style of fragrance itself. But the one thing that you can be assured of when you purchase a Glasshouse Fragrances candle, every candle that you've purchased is going to deliver fragrance and you are going to smell it. And you're never going to have a candle that you buy that you go, "Oh, I can't really smell that." Or, "I won't buy that next time." I never want anyone to ever feel ripped off. I want the candle to smell, I want it to burn beautifully, evenly all the way to the bottom.

Nicole Eckels:
And it's hard to do, because candle making is very, very difficult. Each fragrance is very finicky and it has its own mind. And that's why every candle has different wicks inside, because the way that the system works, every time you design a new candle, you're designing a new system. It's not just that you put fragrance in the wax and then you light it. It's not that at all. We have an 18-month development cycle, but it takes about 12 months to get a candle right. And that's because we go above and beyond. I mean, you can do it a lot quicker than that, but we just don't take the risk. We want it to be perfect.

Hannah Furst:
And in terms of creating a new scent, what is the actual process for adding a new scent to the Glasshouse family?

Nicole Eckels:
We work with perfumers across the globe. And what was interesting is when I started out, I was really working with a lot of distributor type fragrance suppliers. So in fragrance, there are big fragrance suppliers with some of the best perfumers that you could ever work with that all the big brands use. There are very few perfume or fragrance houses that have a resident perfumer. Chanel is one of them, Hermes is another, Guerlain is another, but most brands use the same fragrance houses we do, big brands. And within those brands, they have teams of perfumers. And as you work with them and you work through the different perfumers, you get to know who you like.

Nicole Eckels:
Initially what I was saying is we worked with smaller houses that didn't have that level of talent, but one of the benefits to being the biggest brand in this market is that we order a lot of fragrance for our products, whether it be our candles or eau du parfum or lotions or shower gels, and that purchasing power comes with access to some of the best perfumers, that are experienced, not only in candles, but in all matters of fragrance gorgeousness.

Nicole Eckels:
And so the way it works is I've gotten to know which perfumers I like, that really understand our brand and what we want to do and how we want fragrance to impact you and make you feel. And within that group, I have some that specialise in candles, I have some that specialise in some of the chemistry around personal care, and so depending on the project, we'll decide who we're going with.

Nicole Eckels:
A lot of the recent fragrances that we've launched into the range, or in the past few years, such as Florence or Midnight or Milan, Sydney Sundays, those fragrances all started with the fine fragrance perfume or the eau du parfum. And then what we did with that eau du parfum or that eau du parfum juice that fragrance is we did what the industry calls trickle down. So we turn those essences into a candle fragrance. And then we turn that into a fragrance, and knowing that I always have wanted to really branch into personal care, because that is something I've always understood quite intimately.

Nicole Eckels:
So what we did was we decided, okay, the next few years, every time we launch a candle or pretty much every time, it's going to be derived from an eau du parfum. That way, if we love it and our customers love it, because we're very much about what our customers think, then what we'll do is we'll say, "Okay, great, they love it." Or, "Let's make sure that that goes out into eau du parfum and goes out into body. And sometimes we just go straight into an eau du parfum. We have some exciting things coming out, but that's where I'm really passionate about, is fragrance. And it's the perfumers we use.

Hannah Furst:
And how do you come up with all the names and descriptions for all of the candles? Is that something you loved doing in the early days? Was that one of the thing that was really hard to give up as the business got bigger?

Nicole Eckels:
Well, I haven't given up a lot of the fun stuff. So, I'm still involved in all the fragrance development, I'm still involved in all the naming, I'm still involved in all the packaging design. Of course I have teams to help with it, but the brand is so naturally part of who I am, I just naturally go into a space where, "Yeah, we should name it that," and then it's like, "Okay, we're done. What should we do now?" It's just there.

Hannah Furst:
That would definitely be my favourite part.

Nicole Eckels:
There's some brands have the best names. I mean, I've always wanted to be an OPI nail polish namer. That would be the best job.

Hannah Furst:
Is there a candle you want to make, but you haven't yet?

Nicole Eckels:
Not really. It's really interesting. So, when your distribution is primarily through bricks and mortar, when you're selling through physical stores, you're limited in how big your range can be because shelves are not elastic and you just can't keep pushing product in. But with the wonderful D2C with The Door, with our own e-commerce site, what I love about e-com is that you can just keep creating, and you don't have to worry about if it fits on the shelf.

Nicole Eckels:
So there's been lots of things I've held back on, because I think about, "Well, what are most people going to like? And let's not worry about this one that I'm sure a lot of people are going to hate, but a lot of people will love, too." They got shelved, but now that we have great partners like The Door, now that we have digital where you don't have to worry about it, we're just taking risks all the time. And I love that, because it means we can try fragrances that are proven that I have no idea if anyone's going to love. I might love it, but it could be a total disaster. I don't care. That's great. Because if we're trying things, we're creating. And that's what this is all about, fragrances. It's creating. It's an art form.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah, exactly. Now this one's going to be a tricky question, but we often ask our guests to choose their desert island products, which is often picking a favourite child. But we're going to ask you what your favourite candle scent is.

Nicole Eckels:
It's funny, and people always ask me that, and it depends on when they ask me, because it changes, and I'm the person that needs change. But when I look at my preference in candle fragrance, it's no different than eau du parfum. I'm a fragrance junkie, I'm a scent addict, so have a whole bunch of them, but there'll be three or four, which are always go-to. So if you clean out your shelf, you clean out the closet, you're still going to have three or four because you just know you can't part with them.

Nicole Eckels:
And for me, that would be Midnight Milan, Hamptons, Tahaa, which is so comforting. I adore Florence. So I'd say those are probably my top. I know that. But then what happens is I'm working on something new, and I just think, "God, this is the most unbelievable," and I'll love that for a while. So I do change. That's our customer. Our customer is exactly the same. They're like, "I love this, but I need a break. And I'm going to go over here for a while. And then once I'm sick of that, then I'll come back here. That's how I am.

Hannah Furst:
This is something that we talk a lot on this podcast about. Jo and I have some funny names for scents, and we have a scent that we call Hot Man Smell. And it always comes up in conversation on this podcast. Jo, the two fragrances that you think align to that is the Hamptons and Cyprus, which I actually haven't smelled, but I was having a look at Glasshouse and I thought Arabian Nights might be a good one for me. What would your picks be? So we call this, it's like, because we're both single, it reminds us of a first date or it gets us in the mood for a first date. So that's what we call Hot Man Smell. Have you got any picks for us?

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, I think Arabian Nights is a hot man smell for sure. But really, that's the smell of a hot man. But if you want to attract a hot man, what you need is a Bacon candle, which I don't make. But what we could do instead is just burn Tahaa because there isn't a man on earth that does not love that smell.

Nicole Eckels:
Yeah. That's so true, actually. One of my friends always says how much he loves Tahaa.

Joanna Flemming:
It's such a man smell. It doesn't smell like a man, but they love it. So, there you go.

Nicole Eckels:
Yeah.

Hannah Furst:
The listeners may not know, but Tahaa is, I think, one of our absolute best-selling candles on Adore. Jo, is that your fave?

Joanna Flemming:
One of, yeah. I think I have about nine Glasshouse candles at the moment on rotation. So there's quite a few that are making their way through.

Hannah Furst:
My favourites are the Halloween. I love the Halloween candles that come out.

Joanna Flemming:
Yes. [crosstalk 00:26:32]. I wanted to ask, because we're coming up to Christmas now and I know that I always buy candles for people in my life. I've already bought now, before Christmas, my sister-in-law for Christmas.

Nicole Eckels:
Oh, thank you.

Joanna Flemming:
You're welcome. Loyal customer over here. But I wanted to ask, is it frowned upon for you to give loved ones candles?

Nicole Eckels:
Yeah.

Joanna Flemming:
Is that off-limits?

Nicole Eckels:
It's funny. First of all, everyone that I know wants them. And so they're disappointed if I don't give them to them, but they don't count as a gift. It just doesn't count as a gift. So I can't get away cheaply for Christmas, unfortunately.

Joanna Flemming:
Well, that's a shame. Well, I'll certainly still be buying all the people in my life Glasshouse candles this year. And I'm sure a lot of other people will be doing the same as well. So, thank you so much for joining us today to chat candles, Nicole, it's been a pleasure to talk to you. It's nice to know how they're actually made.

Nicole Eckels:
Oh, thank you. And this is the thing: I just want to thank you for your business and Adore has been a wonderful partner because we are Australian made, I'm speaking to you from our factory in Sydney, and to support my employees, especially through COVID-19 and all the uncertainty in the economy has been absolutely a God send. So thank you. And thank you to all your listeners who have supported the brand for, I'm sure, a while. So thank you.

Joanna Flemming:
All right. Hannah's finally found her product we didn't know we needed. I'm sat here with her for about 10 minutes going through everything that we've both used recently. And she's found one. So tell us about it, Hannah. What is it?

Hannah Furst:
So, basically, Jo stole mine.

Joanna Flemming:
I just got in first.

Hannah Furst:
So I have had to scroll through the whole website, and I remembered that everyone knows I have really frizzy hair, and I tried the Eleven Smooth Me range and they've got a shampoo, conditioner, and then they've got a serum, and I used it the other day. And for a brand that is very affordable, I was blown away. I don't know if it's very affordable. It's not supermarket $6 affordable, but for the quality that you're getting, it's amazing.

Joanna Flemming:
Most of their products are under 30 bucks, I would say.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. Well, actually, what I was going to say is they've got their Christmas pack, which is the trio. So you get the shampoo, conditioner and the serum for $50.90 cents. $51.

Joanna Flemming:
Bargain.

Hannah Furst:
It's basically the cost of one Uber Eats from McDonald's for me. But actually, I tried it on my hair the other day, because my keratin treatment's to wear off now, and it was amazing. It was actually such a good shampoo and conditioner. It's a smoothing anti-freeze shampoo and conditioner, and then you've also got the smoothing serum. And it would be really suitable for anyone that has Hagrid hair like me.

Joanna Flemming:
Is that the most common DM you get? What are your favourite products for frizzy hair?

Hannah Furst:
Yes. I get a lot of DMs saying, "I also am a Hagrid girl." The term "Hagrid hair" has really taken off. Like PWD KWN. We said we would make fetch happen and we did.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah, exactly.

Hannah Furst:
Adore's emails on Wednesdays now have #pwdkwn. I wonder if all the new people that have just signed up to the email database, what the hell is that?

Joanna Flemming:
They're going to have to listen to the podcast to find out, aren't they?

Hannah Furst:
That's me. What about you?

Joanna Flemming:
The product that I apparently stole from you was the-

Hannah Furst:
Thief.

Joanna Flemming:
... the Alpha-H Liquid Gold Midnight Reboot Serum. This is a brand new product from Alpha-H. And I was sent it before it came out to try. It's got both glycolic acid and vitamin A in it. So I think it's got 14% glycolic and then the 1% granactive retinoid. So anyone who has asked the question before, "Can you use your retinol in the same night as your AHA?" It's generally not something that would be recommended unless your skin tolerates it really well, they're two ingredients that you normally wouldn't use on the same night together.

Hannah Furst:
Might alternate.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. But when it's formulated into a specific product, generally, that's totally fine. And using them together, that's actually amazing for anti ageing and for most other concerns as well, but it also has peptides and antioxidants and all of that amazing stuff in there as well.

Joanna Flemming:
And I actually put it down on my list, Hannah, because I've been using it on my chest as well as on my face, but I'm probably using it on my face maybe twice a week, and then on my chest every second night. And I've noticed such a difference in the clarity and the smoothness of my chest, because I tend to be a bit lazy with it, because I'm usually wearing fake tan, and I don't want to take my fake tan off by bringing my actives down to my chest. But I feel like I'm getting to the point now where I need to start doing that, getting towards my late 20s. I need to start using my actives on my chest.

Joanna Flemming:
So, I've been doing that, really, really like the texture of it. And also as you know, I have a little bit more of a sensitive skin type, and I haven't had any issues with sensitivity or flaking or any of that stuff that generally comes along with using those two ingredients together. It's very gentle, but it gives you that next-day glow for sure. Did you find that as well? You wake up the next day and you're like, "Whoa."

Hannah Furst:
Totally. And I would say that Alpha-H is my number one brand that do glycolic and retinol together really well, because it reminds-

Joanna Flemming:
Well, you love that Power Peel.

Hannah Furst:
Power Peel, but I absolutely love this. I put it on last night for the first time, and I woke up with basically not puffy, but kind of puffy skin.

Joanna Flemming:
Plump.

Hannah Furst:
Plump is the right word, but I did feel a little bit puffy as well, which I love.

Joanna Flemming:
I can definitely vouch for the plumpness and also looked really hydrated.

Hannah Furst:
It doesn't strip your skin.

Joanna Flemming:
Yeah. It's really quite gentle. And I think that's probably because it's got the antioxidants and the anti-inflammatory ingredients as well. So it actually is really good for my kind of skin. So that's $129, though, which is a bit more expensive than what Alpha-H usually do. That's something that I like about the brand, is that it's in that range where it's more expensive than The Ordinary, but it's not quite SkinCeuticals pricing. So this ia a little bit on the higher end in terms of pricing for Alpha-H, but I am really enjoying it. So I don't have a negative word to say about it at this point. You'll probably see it in my routine quite a lot. What are your serums that you're enjoying at the moment?

Hannah Furst:
As you know, because my skin has been freaking out a little bit lately, I have been using and the Murad Revitalixir Recovery Serum.

Joanna Flemming:
Oh, I've been using that lately too, actually. She's got a mixture of B's AHAs and I think she might have caffeine and stuff like that as well.

Hannah Furst:
Yeah. So she's pretty much, I think, good for probably all skin types, and particularly if you're finding that your skin's a little bit irritated at the moment. That's one of my faves at the moment.

Joanna Flemming:
I'm still on the Alpha-H vitamin E bandwagon. I've already spoken about Alpha-H, but I bloody love that serum. It's excellent. I know I've already done that as a PWD KWN, I think at one point. It really is so good for sensitive skin types. And if you've got stressed out skin, that and the Osmosis Rescue Serum, a dream combo for anyone with skin that is just not cooperating.

Hannah Furst:
And now that serum that I'm loving at the moment is the SkinCeuticals Blemish and Age Defence serum. So that one's a really good one if you're suffering from breakouts. That's a good one that when you've got your period or you've got some hormonal breakouts happening and then the other one that I've been using is the Aspect Hydrating Serum.

Joanna Flemming:
That's nice as well. All right. Well, I guess we will see everybody next week.

Hannah Furst:
Thanks everyone for joining us today.

Joanna Flemming:
Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us. And also we really want to know what you thought about this podcast. So if you can leave us a review, that would be much appreciated.